Here's a look at what some teachers, district leaders, and school board members had to say about the secretary's first year on the job.


The Trump administration may push school choice for children of military personnel, Native American students, and kids living in the District of Columbia.


Arizona, Louisiana, and New Hampshire have told the U.S. Department they are interested in applying to participate in the Every Student Succeeds Act's Innovative Assessment Pilot.


A recent tweet from Speaker of the House Paul Ryan highlighted how the new tax code meant $1.50 a week extra for a school secretary. Just what does that mean in context?


School districts: Interested in having your local, state, and federal funding follow children, so that kids with greater need have more money attached to them? Now's your chance.


No one may be more interested in the idea of a federal investment in school construction than communities where federal facilities have a large footprint.


There was less attention on education in this year's speech than any similar joint address to Congress dating back to 1989, a review by the Education Week library found.


President Donald Trump used his first State of the Union address to call on Congress to create a path of citizenship for "Dreamers" and to provide big new funding for infrastructure, but he made almost no mention of K-12 schools.


Congress is still wrestling with a basic question: How to use educational data to improve schools, without further jeopardizing student privacy?


School choice, immigration, career and technical education, and early-childhood are among the topics ripe for a mention as President Donald Trump speaks to a joint session of Congress.


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