School resource officers, more guidance counselors, and training for teachers can help head off tragedies like the Sandy Hook shootings, witnesses told a congressional panel.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said sequestration will give him no choice but to cut money for disadvantaged and special education students.


Now that sequestration, that looming, scary, Inside-the-Beltway possibility, is finally upon us, what does that mean for states and school districts?


Education funding took center stage at a roundtable for superintendents, school board members and others that Rep. John Kline held back in his suburban Minnesota district.


The $15 million effort aims to place close to 2,000 volunteers in schools over the next three years.


Auditors found minor problems with oversight of Investing in Innovation grants, but potentially bigger issues if the workload of the U.S. Department of Education grows.


The White House releases state-by-state estimates of how many teachers could lose their jobs, if automatic spending cuts go through this week.


U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, the top Republican on the Senate education committee, is not pleased with U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan's talk about giving district-level waivers.


The U.S. Secretary of Education continues to send strong signals that he may grant tailored, district-level NCLB waivers in states that have not already won this flexibility.


A commission created by Congress is calling for states, with federal support, to revamp their school funding systems and teacher pipelines to direct more resources to the most at-risk students.


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