Republicans on the House education committee plan to introduce a series of bills this week aimed at renewing the Higher Education Act, federal legislation that includes the entire student loan system.


Want to know what areas the Education Department will be paying special attention to when it doles out increasingly scarce federal grant money?


It's a timely question, given that there's been a lot of action in Race to the Top states over the last week that could spark big changes to states' overall plans.


Senate Democrats and Republicans, some of whom have been working more than a decade to overhaul the federal workforce training law, may finally have their day on the chamber floor.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan never actually told Oklahoma it could lose federal dollars if it withdrew from Common Core State Standards.


The Empire State could lose nearly $300 million if the state follows through on a proposal to put off incorporating test scores from common-core-aligned exams in teacher evaluation.


From state assessments and school turnarounds to teacher equity, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and company won't get much time to kick back and work on their tans.


Democrats for Education Reform, the political action committee meant to help counter the teachers' unions' influence on the Democratic party, is trying to make it easier for the public to donate to its favored candidates.


The big news last week was the Vergara verdict and its implications for teacher policy.


Budget constraints and profound mistrust among tribal communities for the federal government are some of the obstacles to overhauling the Bureau of Indian Education.


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