President Barack Obama and GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney tangled over class size, teachers, and education funding during Monday night's foreign-policy debate.


Could education pop up during tonight's foreign policy presidential debate? Maybe. Both President Barack Obama and GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney have linked international competitiveness to K-12 policy.


Idaho joins 33 other states plus the District of Columbia that have designed their own accountability systems under waivers from No Child Left Behind that have been granted by the U.S. Department of Education.


During their second duel of this campaign, President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney on Tuesday night framed the issue of education as an economic one.


Obama and Romney representatives at an American Enterprise Institute debate highlighted the differences between the candidates on key issues.


When setting goals new goals for schools and groups of at-risk students as part of the No Child Left Behind waiver process, what should matter more: proficiency rates six years from now, or the rate of growth?


Phil Handy, an education adviser to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, called the waivers granted under No Child Left Behind "too prescriptive" and said they've led to "unfortunate results."


This is the debate before the debate. Two key education advisers are facing off tonight in a debate at Teachers College, Columbia University, which is being co-sponsored by Education Week. You can watch it online at 7 p.m. by signing up here. In President Barack Obama's corner is Jon Schnur, an education adviser to President Obama who co-founded New Leaders for New Schools and has more recently started America Achieves. Representing Republican challenger Mitt Romney is Phil Handy, the former chairman of the Florida State Board of Education and the higher education co-chair for the campaign. Post-game analysis will ...


Vice President Joe Biden said budget cuts proposed by GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan would kick 200,000 students out of Head Start.


Put budget, vouchers, and community colleges on your vice-presidential debate bingo card.


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