It's 1981, and Education Week obtains a top-secret memo by President Ronald Reagan's education secretary saying the U.S. Department of Education should be abolished and its functions reassigned to other federal agencies.


Several Race to the Top states are tweaking their implementation of new teacher-evaluation policies adopted as part of the promises made in their applications.


As we move deeper into midterm election season, here's a preview of some potentially competitive House and Senate races with ramifications for education.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan joins others at a Washington event commemorating the landmark 1964 law, but saying more work still needs to be done.


The two national teachers' unions played some serious politics during their recent annual conferences, including calling for the resignation of U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.


The U.S. Secretary of Education also said that Pennsylvania's current level of commitment to funding public schools in Philadelphia is "unacceptable."


The U.S. Department of Education's process for holding state's feet to the fire on the promises they made in their applications hasn't been transparent, advocates say.


The Education and the Workforce Committee cleared three bills with bipartisan support Thursday in its opening bid to reauthorize the Higher Education Act.


If Seattle gets the go-ahead from Duncan, it would be the first individual district in the country to get its very own waiver.


The House is set to pass the bipartisan workforce development bill Wednesday afternoon by a wide margin. The measure would provide greater access to job training for students entering the workforce with special needs.


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