The Obama campaign has released an ad warning that presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney would usher in big cuts to K-12 spending.


President Barack Obama will make education spending a major focus of his next two campaign stops, when he visits the swing states of Ohio and Nevada.


Some congressional races have implications for K-12 policy and spending.


The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is not disclosing basic details about the competition in which Head Start providers are having to reapply for their funds.


First Lady Michelle Obama invited 54 students ages 8 to 12 who submitted recipes for the Healthy Lunchtime Challenge. Students had to create meals that are healthy and tasty.


Less than a week after presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney tapped Rep. Paul Ryan as his running mate, President Barack Obama used his weekly radio address to warn the nation of the potentially dire impact of Ryan's budget on K-12 funding.


More than half of the nation's school districts are not eligible to apply on their own for the Race to the Top competition for districts because their enrollments are too small.


A new Obama campaign ad and Rep. Paul Ryan's entrance onto the Republican ticket have put college costs back into the campaign spotlight.


Schools participating in the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program should be able to serve frozen, dried, and canned items, a House committee says, although the program was created to introduce poor children to fresh produce they are unlikely to eat at home.


Applicants have until Oct. 30 to seek grants worth up to $40 million for the biggest districts. The prizes are designed to spur a focus on personalized learning.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments