Districts that get federal impact aid have been preparing for the prospect of automatic budget cuts for months, but the cuts would still hurt.


Organizations around Washington are taking different tacks in trying to persuade lawmakers to spare K-12 from a possible 8.2 percent across-the-board cut come January.


Questions persist in the Education Department's $400 million district Race to the Top contest, including how Education Secretary Arne Duncan will ultimately pick the winners.


If lawmakers don't act to head off a series of automatic spending cuts, states and districts around the country will feel a squeeze—but some may be more heavily impacted than others.


Justin Hamilton, a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Education, is leaving the agency, the latest in a series of departures from the communications shop.


High school completion still must be a significant part of accountability systems under No Child Left Behind Act waivers, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan emphasizes.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a speech that he thinks teacher preparation is broken and that the best educators need to be teaching the highest-need children.


The state-by-state data show graduation rates that range from 59 percent in the District of Columbia to 88 percent in Iowa.


The last day for Peter Cunningham, trusted adviser to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, is Nov. 30.


Two-thirds of schools that tapped into a new infusion of School Improvement Grant cash made first-year math and reading gains, but a third saw achievement drop.


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