The blank spots in state plans could set up an interesting test for Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who has made local control a watchword for her department.


On April 28, the measure Congress approved late last year to keep the government funded for the rest of fiscal 2017 will expire.


Tax-credit scholarships could be one of several ways that President Donald Trump's administration and Congress could use to promote school choice from Washingto


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos supported rescinding the Obama administration's guidance on transgender students, but she's also argued that protecting all students from bullying and harassment is one of her top priorities.


Many of these folks have been working in the education department since the beginning of the Trump administration, but now they will have more formal, official roles.


Of the nine state plans released so far, at least five include—or plan to include—academic or extracurricular subjects beyond reading and math.


Under the Every Student Succeeds Act, states have a lot of leeway in deciding what their long-term academic goals will be. A look at their goals reveals that states are taking advantage of that flexibility.


A number of advocacy groups and research organizations have—or are planning to create—some ESSA resources for states and advocacy groups.


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has talked up the section of ESSA that allows states to set aside 3 percent of their Title I money to promote "direct student services" including course choice.


Sources say lawmakers are seriously considering turning the law's Title IV funding into a competitive-grant program at the state level, at least temporarily.


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