The U.S. Department of Education today granted waivers to eight of the 26 states (plus the District of Columbia) that applied in February for wiggle room under the No Child Left Behind Act. The second-round waiver states are: Connecticut, Delaware, Louisiana, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Rhode Island. Ohio has not received approval yet on its grading system, but it's waiver isn't considered conditional. Notice a pattern there? Except for Connecticut and Louisiana, all of the waiver recipients were among the dozen states that won a slice of the $4 billion Race to the Top fund. That ...


John Chubb, the interim executive director of Education Sector, a think tank in Washington, has bowed out of his work with the Romney campaign, Alexander Russo reports. There's even more from Russo on Chubb here....


Presumptive nominee Mitt Romney has said Obama did a good job with choice and merit-pay, and his surrogate, Gov. Jeb Bush has given Obama high praise for standing up to unions.


The Obama campaign sought to tout the president's accomplishments on K-12, and throw cold water on Romney's record in Massachusetts and his ideas for revamping K-12.


Some might say that education is the poster child for the Obama "We Can't Wait" initiative.


UPDATED WASHINGTON—Presumptive GOP nominee Gov. Mitt Romney called today for making federal funding for special education and disadvantaged students portable—meaning the money would follow students to any school their parents choose, including a private school. Under his proposal, parents could also choose to use the funds under Title I and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act at charter schools, for online courses, or for tutoring. Title I is funded at $14.5 billion this year, and IDEA is funded at $11.6 billion, and any proposal to radically shift the use of that money would be almost certain...


Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney and his education advisers have been mulling a beefed-up role for school choice using federal funding.


The presumptive GOP presidential nominee releases his list of education policy advisers, including a former U.S. Secretary of Education and a current state schools chief.


The Education Department is issuing draft criteria for the $400 million in new Race to the Top competitive grants earmarked for districts.


Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee is asking the Government Accountability Office, Congress' investigative arm, to look into state's progress in putting in place the teacher and principal portions of their Race to Top applications


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