A stop-gap funding bill passed by Congress includes long-term money for the popular Childrens Health Insurance Program, but advocates wonder why it took so long.


Although the government was on track to reopen on Monday after a brief shutdown, issues underlying behind it, specifically the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, haven't been resolved by the deal, which lasts until Feb. 8.


A short-term federal government shutdown means a much quieter U.S. Department of Education headquarters than usual, but not much immediate effect on most school districts.


U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has the thumbs-up to ESSA plans from Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Montana, and New Hampshire.


It is unclear if all states have implemented ESSA's requirement to provide transportation as needed for students in foster care, a report from the Chronicle of Social Change found.


Jim Blew, Kenneth L. Marcus, and Mick Zais got the OK from the Senate education committee for positions under Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.


DeVos and lawmakers didn't offer specifics about how they might get new choice legislation over the finish line in an election year that's expected to be tough for Republicans.


Senators tell President Donald Trump that improving school facilities is "essential for advancing student achievement" and should be a part of any broader infrastructure spending plan.


Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' memo on plans in case of a government shutdown notes that the department's approach is similar to contingency plans made in 1996, 2011, 2013, and 2016.


DeVos approved plans for Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.


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