The U.S. Department of Education is reducing its backlog of public-information requests, but it still takes the agency more than a month on average to fulfill even the simplest requests.


By guest blogger Liana Heitin In sharp contrast to last summer's celebrity-attended rally and march to the White House, the Save Our Schools gathering this year proved a quiet, 150-person affair. Held this weekend in the regal Wardman Park Marriott in downtown Washington, the convention featured presentations on an array of topics including advocacy, social justice, and elevating student voice, and a keynote by author and activist Jonathan Kozol. Attendees also attended workshops during which they crafted official policy stances to eventually present to policymakers (though these sessions were closed to the media). Mike Klonsky, Chicago-based educator and activist who ...


Happy Friday! August is typically a slow month in the education world (no school, lots of folks on vacation) but there's been some interesting news this week.


Bellwether Education, the non-profit education organization co-founded by Andy Rotherham of the still-fabulous Eduwonk blog, is bringing on some new folks—and saying farewell to Kim Smith, another co-founder.


Sandra Abrevaya, former U.S. Department of Education press secretary, is leaving Washington this month to take a different type of gig in the education world: She's becoming the very first executive director of the Chicago office of Urban Alliance.


The U.S. Department of Education got 242 applications for a slice of the nearly $60 million in funding for the program, which helps communities pair education with other services, including pre-kindergarten, health, and arts education.


State waiver applications include a lot of promising practices, but also plenty of potential areas of concern, an analysis by the Center for American Progress found.


U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings were both big NCLB fans back in 2001, but times have changed. Can two of the biggest names in federal education policy find common ground on NCLB?


So there was a big hearing today on the impact of looming across-the-board domestic funding cuts, held by the Senate appropriations panel that deals with education spending. Now, U.S. Rep. George Miller of California, the top Democrat on the House Education Committee, is hoping his panel will follow suit. "Congress has a responsibility [under legislation passed last year] to put forward a balanced and responsible fiscal plan for the nation," Miller said. "To avoid the fiscal cliff, choices will have to be made. The stakes are high for workers, families, and children. I ask that our committee convene a ...


A set of sweeping, across-the-board trigger cuts set to go into effect in January would be "devastating" to education programs, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Democratic lawmakers said at a hearing today.


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