Early reaction from the two national teachers' unions suggests teacher evaluation could be a sticking point.


Advocates for poor and minority students, students with disabilities, and others sent a letter to Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wy., expressing deep concerns with legislation to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Proposed legislation would eliminate the 2013-14 deadline for bringing all students to proficiency in math and reading, but keep the law's testing regime in place.


Although Sept. 30 was the deadline for states to "obligate" the majority of their stimulus funds, some still have big balances left and, technically, have until Jan. 3 to deplete their funds.


The National Council of La Raza, which advocates for English-language learners, is worried about the potential impact of language in a widely circulated draft of a Senate plan to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Sen. Bennet is pleased that the committee appears poised to include salary comparability and Race to the Top in its ESEA renewal bill.


Race to the Top, first created under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, would become an authorized part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act under a draft of Senate education leader's reauthorization propoal.


Now that the Senate is getting close to consideration of a bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, groups are beginning to release their ideas on key aspects of the law, including teacher quality.


A draft NCLB proposal would put a strong federal focus on the lowest-performing schools and those with big achievement gaps.


Count the National Education Association as a fan (for the most part) of the No Child Left Behind Act renewal bill put forth last month by Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.


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