The latest ESEA renewal draft would require only districts that participate in the Teacher Incentive Fund to develop mandatory teacher evaluation systems.


The National Education Association and the America Association of School Administrators wants to put the brakes on rewrite of No Child Left Behind, at least on the bill Sen. Tom Harkin has proposed.


As part of a new No Child Left Behind, the Council of Chief State Schools Officers want more leeway in intervening in the lowest-performing schools, and in determining growth and performance targets.


The bill to be debated next week reflects "10 months of bipartisan negotiations."


Teacher evaluation is definitely an area to watch as the Senate debates a renewal of the No Child Left Behind Act.


California, New York, and Texas are among the states that did not tell the U.S. Department of Education they planned to apply for a waiver under No Child Left Behind.


Early reaction from the two national teachers' unions suggests teacher evaluation could be a sticking point.


Advocates for poor and minority students, students with disabilities, and others sent a letter to Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wy., expressing deep concerns with legislation to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Proposed legislation would eliminate the 2013-14 deadline for bringing all students to proficiency in math and reading, but keep the law's testing regime in place.


Although Sept. 30 was the deadline for states to "obligate" the majority of their stimulus funds, some still have big balances left and, technically, have until Jan. 3 to deplete their funds.


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