The five states that just narrowly missed winning a slice of the Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge Fund will get a chance to compete for $133 million in new money, the U.S. Department of Education announced today.


Memo to Gov. Mitt Romney's team of education advisers: We've heard you have a little problem winning over the ladies (by which we mean attracting female voters.)


If Congress doesn't stop the big, giant across the board cuts to set to hit (almost) every education under the sun next January, what would that mean for you?


Alyson will be flying solo on the blog starting later this month while Michele is on maternity leave.


Voters want to hear the candidates' talk more how they plan to address issues like school funding and college affordability, according to a College Board survey.


On the heels of a report rising student loan debt has become a direct threat to the nation's economic stability, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Vice President Joe Biden held an event in the swing state of Virginia on college affordability.


StopBullying.gov has more information and can be followed through social media, too.


Florida got a waiver under the No Child Left Behind Act giving districts freedom from having to set aside money for tutoring, but the state legislature stepped in and will keep the requirement for at least next school year.


U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, is proposing legislation that would provide $20 billion to modernize schools, $60 billion to hire teachers, and $10 billion to provide professional development to educators.


The clash between the Obama administration's support for Race to the Top and other grant programs, and folks in Congress who want bigger investments in funding for special education and disadvantaged students, is not going away anytime soon.


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