The Education Department seems ready to waive the 2014 deadline for all students to be proficient in math and language arts in exchange for states adopting college- and career-readiness standards and tests.


Republicans say the measure would make it easier for districts and states to direct federal dollars where they are most needed.But Democrats say the proposed leeway would allow districts and states to ignore the students most at risk - poor and minority kids.


More states are pushing back deadlines and scaling back or even eliminating projects they promised to do as part of winning the $4 billion federal Race to the Top competition.


New legislation in Congress would overhaul the Title I funding formula, which rural advocates say favors larger, urban areas over poor, rural districts and small cities.


The U.S. Department of Education has given Montana an Aug. 15 deadline to report how the state plans to comply with the No Child Left Behind Act.


States and districts would get unprecedented leeway to move around federal money under the latest in a series of bill reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


A bill offering superintendents flexibility in spending federal dollars is likely to stir partisan battle.


Duncan doesn't offer the House education chairman any details on his proposal to give states leeway on some of the requirements of No Child Left Behind in exchange for adopting reforms.


Up to six communities will get the chance to create a version of the Harlem Children's Zone in their own backyards, now that the U.S. Department of Education has opened up the very first round of Promise Neighborhood implementation grants.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said he would take enforcement action against Montana for defying parts of No Child Left Behind.


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