Back in Massachusetts, then-Gov. Mitt Romney proposed ideas on turnarounds and teacher quality that closely mirror proposals that President Barack Obama put forth just a few years later. Case in point? Romney's turnaround plan, which never got through the Democratically-controlled state legislature, but which called for districts to remove a school's principal, turn schools into charters, and give local leaders more autonomy. Sounds very similar to the School Improvement Grant program to me. Romney was also hoping to tie teacher evaluations to test scores. Read all about it in this story. Some interesting details from Romney's record that didn't make ...


"Lots of these kids have had pretty good experiences," Education Secretary Arne Duncan said. "That's heartwarming," and not something he would have expected as little as five years ago. "Things are going the right way."


By now, ever education blogger has had over a week to hem and haw about Gov. Mitt Romney's education proposals. So if you haven't already, check out these good reads.


Republicans in Congress and Democrats, including the Obama administration, are still trying to figure out a way to pay for a plan to keep student loans rates stable.


The U.S. Department of Education today granted waivers to eight of the 26 states (plus the District of Columbia) that applied in February for wiggle room under the No Child Left Behind Act. The second-round waiver states are: Connecticut, Delaware, Louisiana, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Rhode Island. Ohio has not received approval yet on its grading system, but it's waiver isn't considered conditional. Notice a pattern there? Except for Connecticut and Louisiana, all of the waiver recipients were among the dozen states that won a slice of the $4 billion Race to the Top fund. That ...


John Chubb, the interim executive director of Education Sector, a think tank in Washington, has bowed out of his work with the Romney campaign, Alexander Russo reports. There's even more from Russo on Chubb here....


Presumptive nominee Mitt Romney has said Obama did a good job with choice and merit-pay, and his surrogate, Gov. Jeb Bush has given Obama high praise for standing up to unions.


The Obama campaign sought to tout the president's accomplishments on K-12, and throw cold water on Romney's record in Massachusetts and his ideas for revamping K-12.


Some might say that education is the poster child for the Obama "We Can't Wait" initiative.


UPDATED WASHINGTON—Presumptive GOP nominee Gov. Mitt Romney called today for making federal funding for special education and disadvantaged students portable—meaning the money would follow students to any school their parents choose, including a private school. Under his proposal, parents could also choose to use the funds under Title I and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act at charter schools, for online courses, or for tutoring. Title I is funded at $14.5 billion this year, and IDEA is funded at $11.6 billion, and any proposal to radically shift the use of that money would be almost certain...


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