The two top Republicans in the House when it comes to K-12 policy want a detailed explanation of the Education Department's NCLB waiver plan by July 1.


Education historian Diane Ravitch may be the most active Tweeter in the education policy world.


Rather than seek a waiver, Idaho schools' chief Tom Luna is telling the U.S. Department of Education it will ignore NCLB and implement its own accountability system.


It's an open question whether the measure is a harbinger of many more bipartisan ESEA bills to come, or just a brief, feel-good moment before the fighting starts up.


The U.S. Department of Education is creating a new office to focus on school turnaround efforts.


Teacher training programs would be held accountable for producing educators who demonstrate the ability to boost student achievement before they even graduate, under a bill introduced today by a powerful, bipartisan handful of senators.


As Utah's Republican governor, Jon Huntsman Jr. signed legislation in 2005 that required his state to ignore the No Child Left Behind Act. Eventually, the state backed down.


A group of more than 40 states bands together to offer a suggest an alternative to the accountability system under No Child Left Behind.


Safe and drug-free schools programs will be moved down a rung on the Education Department's organizational ladder.


The Education Department plans to put announcements in plain language, but it hasn't been exactly forthcoming about its plan for NCLB regulatory relief.


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