As lawmakers gear up to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, one question is what will happen to the free tutoring programs schools are required to offer if they fail to meet the law's achievement targets.


Some of the nine Race to the Top runners-up from last year aren't too sure about Education Secretary Arne Duncan's offer to split $200 million to implement small pieces of their original plans.


The House education panel approves a measure that would eliminate programs the committee sees as duplicative or not the right role for the federal government.


South Carolina Superintendent of Education Mick Zais said "no thanks" today to the new $200 million Race to the Top contest for the 9 high-scoring states that didn't win last year.


The nine states that lost last year's Race to the Top competition are eligible to compete again for grants ranging from $10 million to $50 million.


Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act seems to be stuck in neutral, with even the administration expressing frustration with the pace of negotiations. Now the National School Boards Association and the American Association of School Administrators have launched a petition calling on members of Congress to please support regulatory relief. The U.S. Department of Education would ultimately be responsible for regulatory relief. Specifically, the two groups would like the law's timetable of sanctions essentially to be put on pause for a year. That would mean schools that have already failed to make progress towards the goal of ...


The House education committee chairman gives radio host Bill Bennett his views on how reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act might proceed.


Tim Pawlenty, the former two-term Minnesota governor, has a lengthy resume of education policy activism that will likely influence the education platform of his presidential bid.


Daren Briscoe, a former Newsweek reporter who joined the Obama administration in 2009, will be the new deputy press secretary at the U.S. Department of Education.


With a key Congressman giving NCLB "no chance" of being rewritten by August, the U.S. Department of Education will likely start focusing on waivers to give states relief from the law's penalties.


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