Education Week's Teacher Beat blog will chronicle the happenings of the National Education Association's Representative Assembly.


By guest blogger Nirvi Shah The U.S. Department of Education says new data about thousands of schools and school districts show that students across the country don't have equal access to a rigorous education. Using information amassed about 72,000 schools in every district in the country with more than 3,000 students through the civil rights data collection, the department's office of civil rights hopes to get a picture of how equitable schools are within a district and across states. (The data includes information for about half the nation's school districts. The ones that aren't included have fewer ...


South Dakota will freeze its performance targets at 2009-10 levels, thus ignoring No Child Left Behind.


In separate letters, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan gives states more information about the next Race to the Top and reminds them that incidents of cheating on tests are not good for school reform.


Three winners from last year's Investing in Innovation program shared insight into how they crafted a successful application.


The two top Republicans in the House when it comes to K-12 policy want a detailed explanation of the Education Department's NCLB waiver plan by July 1.


Education historian Diane Ravitch may be the most active Tweeter in the education policy world.


Rather than seek a waiver, Idaho schools' chief Tom Luna is telling the U.S. Department of Education it will ignore NCLB and implement its own accountability system.


It's an open question whether the measure is a harbinger of many more bipartisan ESEA bills to come, or just a brief, feel-good moment before the fighting starts up.


The U.S. Department of Education is creating a new office to focus on school turnaround efforts.


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