Bellwether Education, the non-profit education organization co-founded by Andy Rotherham of the still-fabulous Eduwonk blog, is bringing on some new folks—and saying farewell to Kim Smith, another co-founder.


Sandra Abrevaya, former U.S. Department of Education press secretary, is leaving Washington this month to take a different type of gig in the education world: She's becoming the very first executive director of the Chicago office of Urban Alliance.


The U.S. Department of Education got 242 applications for a slice of the nearly $60 million in funding for the program, which helps communities pair education with other services, including pre-kindergarten, health, and arts education.


State waiver applications include a lot of promising practices, but also plenty of potential areas of concern, an analysis by the Center for American Progress found.


U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander and former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings were both big NCLB fans back in 2001, but times have changed. Can two of the biggest names in federal education policy find common ground on NCLB?


So there was a big hearing today on the impact of looming across-the-board domestic funding cuts, held by the Senate appropriations panel that deals with education spending. Now, U.S. Rep. George Miller of California, the top Democrat on the House Education Committee, is hoping his panel will follow suit. "Congress has a responsibility [under legislation passed last year] to put forward a balanced and responsible fiscal plan for the nation," Miller said. "To avoid the fiscal cliff, choices will have to be made. The stakes are high for workers, families, and children. I ask that our committee convene a ...


A set of sweeping, across-the-board trigger cuts set to go into effect in January would be "devastating" to education programs, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and Democratic lawmakers said at a hearing today.


There's been a lot of chatter in Washington lately on whether Congress will decide to extend language allowing teachers in alternative-certification programs to be considered "highly qualified" for an additional two years.


Children's health advocates warn that preventing an expansion of health insurance coverage for low-income parents not covered by Medicaid could keep some of their children from getting insurance, too, even if those kids are eligible for other coverage.


Key federal education programs wouldn't be cut in the middle of the next school year even if automatic domestic spending cuts go through, according to a letter the U.S. Department of Education sent out to chief state school officers late Friday.


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