Join me and the Hechinger Institute's Richard Lee Colvin at 2 p.m. today as we discuss the effects of the economic-stimulus package, as detailed in a special project that involved education reporters from across the nation. We'll take your questions, so please, submit yours now....


The U.S. Department of Education would see its budget slashed by more than $5 billion under the temporary spending bill approved early this morning, which now faces a showdown in the Senate as a March 4 final passage deadline looms.


The commission will recommend ways that federal policy could address funding disparities.


Good news and bad news for fans of education spending. The good news: The U.S. House of Representatives just voted to restore the $557.7 million cut to special education state grants in the fiscal year 2011 spending bill now under consideration on the House floor (you know, the one that will finance the government through Sept. 30 and cuts nearly $5 billion in education funding). The grants would stay funded at their current level of $11.5 billion. The money was put back through an amendment, offered by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash. Her three-year-old son, Cole, has ...


Ten states didn't win a dime from the competitions, an EdWeek analysis of U.S. Department of Education data shows.


Continued fiscal pressure are likely to pose a big hurdle for states looking to sustain momentum on education reform sparked by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, a survey finds.


The Big 8 lawmakers on education are headed to the White House on Thursday to meet with the president and discuss ESEA.


President Barack Obama just issued a veto threat on the House Spending Plan which would cut education by nearly $5 billion.


Republicans are not in a spendy mood, so many of the increases in the Obama administration's fiscal year 2012 budget proposal may well be Dead On Arrival on Capitol Hill. But the budget is more than just a spending plan, it's a policy document. And some of these proposals (especially the ones that don't cost a dime) may yet make it into law, namely, into the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Act. The most interesting proposed changes are in Race to the Top, part of the economic stimulus that would be extended under the proposal. If the administration actually ...


The Obama administration just released its spending proposal for fiscal year 2012, which begins Oct. 1. And once again, education is a bright spot in an otherwise tight budget year.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments