Is there a smart way for presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump to prepare for their debates? Some research on cramming and study techniques suggests some possible answers.


If Education Week readers had their way, the candidates would be talking about teacher recruitment, educational equity, and the Every Student Succeeds Act at the first presidential debate Monday.


On Thursday, the House passed the Supporting Youth Opportunity and Preventing Delinquency Act of 2016 by a vote of 382-29. It's a proposed retooling of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, which was first passed in 1974.


States and districts that get federal funding to support English-learners can use that money to help track long-term ELLs and ELLs with learning disabilities, as well as to help figure out how former ELLs are progressing, according to guidance released Friday.


Those eagerly awaiting mentions of education in every campaign stump speech, town hall, and debate would have enjoyed the 2000 presidential contest.


Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, says Hillary Clinton has made it clear to teachers that her K-12 policy won't look like the first six years of President Barack Obama' administration.


King, who probably has just a few months left in office, spoke to reporters about a range of issues at a breakfast hosted by the Christian Science Monitor.


Republicans say the Education Department is going too far in its attempts to regulate the requirement that federal money for schools supplement state and local K-12 aid.


U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King, Jr. visited half a dozen Southern states, with stops touching on education from pre-K to college.


The U.S. Secretary of Education talks with Politics K-12 about the administration's accomplishments and on setting the stage for implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


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