The latest proposal would keep things afloat for two weeks and give lawmakers a chance to continue negotiations on a bill to finance the government for the rest of fiscal year 2011.


While a shutdown probably would not be a picnic for anyone, if the past is any guide, most school districts and states wouldn't feel an immediate pinch.


The transformation model, often viewed as the least restrictive turnaround model under the federal program, again proves most popular, surveys by the Center on Education Policy show.


The assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education has been approached about several outside positions, the Education Department confirms.


Pressure mounts on the U.S. Senate to reject current-year cuts to programs such as Head Start, Title I, and School Improvement Grants approved by the House of Representatives in the bill passed last weekend.


Join me and the Hechinger Institute's Richard Lee Colvin at 2 p.m. today as we discuss the effects of the economic-stimulus package, as detailed in a special project that involved education reporters from across the nation. We'll take your questions, so please, submit yours now....


The U.S. Department of Education would see its budget slashed by more than $5 billion under the temporary spending bill approved early this morning, which now faces a showdown in the Senate as a March 4 final passage deadline looms.


The commission will recommend ways that federal policy could address funding disparities.


Good news and bad news for fans of education spending. The good news: The U.S. House of Representatives just voted to restore the $557.7 million cut to special education state grants in the fiscal year 2011 spending bill now under consideration on the House floor (you know, the one that will finance the government through Sept. 30 and cuts nearly $5 billion in education funding). The grants would stay funded at their current level of $11.5 billion. The money was put back through an amendment, offered by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash. Her three-year-old son, Cole, has ...


Ten states didn't win a dime from the competitions, an EdWeek analysis of U.S. Department of Education data shows.


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