Last year, when the Investing in Innovation pot was bigger, 1,600 applicants competed for $650 million. This year, with $150 million up for grabs, nearly 1,400 are likely to apply.


Tough spending choices could be in store for states and districts on K-12 education if Congress and President Obama fail to reach a deal on raising the debt ceiling--and even if they do.


States that have signaled they will not apply for the $500 million Race to the Top early-learning competition include Florida, California, and Tennessee.


The U.S. Department of Education could withhold federal funds and require better testing security in the fallout of numerous cheating scandals.


Thelma Melendez, the assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education at the U.S. Department of Education, is leaving to take the helm of the Santa Ana school district in Orange County, Calif.


The president met with several CEOs this afternoon to ask the business community to commit more money to improving K-12 education.


The Education Department seems ready to waive the 2014 deadline for all students to be proficient in math and language arts in exchange for states adopting college- and career-readiness standards and tests.


Republicans say the measure would make it easier for districts and states to direct federal dollars where they are most needed.But Democrats say the proposed leeway would allow districts and states to ignore the students most at risk - poor and minority kids.


More states are pushing back deadlines and scaling back or even eliminating projects they promised to do as part of winning the $4 billion federal Race to the Top competition.


New legislation in Congress would overhaul the Title I funding formula, which rural advocates say favors larger, urban areas over poor, rural districts and small cities.


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