Continued fiscal pressure are likely to pose a big hurdle for states looking to sustain momentum on education reform sparked by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, a survey finds.


The Big 8 lawmakers on education are headed to the White House on Thursday to meet with the president and discuss ESEA.


President Barack Obama just issued a veto threat on the House Spending Plan which would cut education by nearly $5 billion.


Republicans are not in a spendy mood, so many of the increases in the Obama administration's fiscal year 2012 budget proposal may well be Dead On Arrival on Capitol Hill. But the budget is more than just a spending plan, it's a policy document. And some of these proposals (especially the ones that don't cost a dime) may yet make it into law, namely, into the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Act. The most interesting proposed changes are in Race to the Top, part of the economic stimulus that would be extended under the proposal. If the administration actually ...


The Obama administration just released its spending proposal for fiscal year 2012, which begins Oct. 1. And once again, education is a bright spot in an otherwise tight budget year.


The Republican budget plan would cut U.S. Department of Education funding to $4.9 billion below the fiscal 2010 level of $63.7 billion, including cuts to special education and Pell Grants.


Look for education as a bright spot in an austere budget, and a sequel with a twist we could call Race to the Top: The Locals Strike Back


Three things were obvious after the new GOPed-up House education committee held its first hearing on education.


A huge shortfall in the program to help low-income students attend college could cause aftershocks for other domestic programs, including education.


For U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, local school board members can be a really tough crowd. Last year, the National School Boards Association members gave Duncan grief after he tangled with them over his support of mayoral control. Not dissuaded, Duncan came back today to address the same crowd, whose members have come to grips with the new federal education reality. And many of them don't really like it. (They didn't really like their reality under former EdSec Margaret Spellings either.) In his speech, Duncan had nothing really new to say, choosing instead to reiterate past accomplishments (think ...


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