Judy Wurtzel, the deputy assistant secretary for planning, evaluation and policy development, is leaving the U.S. Department of Education to focus on "family and work part-time," she wrote in an email to colleagues yesterday. Today is her last day at the department, where she worked under Assistant Secretary Carmel Martin and helped shape the department's school improvement strategy. "The past two years have been extraordinary for the Department and for education reform across the country. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to contribute to this effort," wrote Wurtzel, who served as the executive director of the Aspen ...


Two years ago this month Congress passed the economic stimulus package, infusing the nation's schools with an additional $100 billion and providing an endless source of intrigue for us @ Politics K-12. While it may seem like a lot of the stimulus fun is over—you know, Race to the Top awards have been handed out, people are coming to grips with the four turnaround models—I think the fun (if you can call it that) is just beginning. And that's because we need to start asking: Where did all of that money go? In my quest to start answering...


If Congress doesn't move on reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act this year, states are poised to get going on their own ideas on accountability and other areas.


Congress Geeks, clear your calendars! Next Thursday, the House Education and the Workforce Committee is planning to hold the very first hearing on the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act since the House of Representatives flipped to GOP control and Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., became the committee chairman. The title of the hearing is pretty expansive. It's called Education in the Nation: Examining the Challenges and Opportunities Facing America's Classrooms. The hearing will give members a broad overview of the issues facing K-12 schools, including the federal role in education policy, a spokesman for the panel told me. ...


The new Republican chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee and the committee's top Democrat agree on a few basics when it comes to reauthorizing ESEA.


Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., aka Mr. Let's-Ditch-the-Department-of-Education, got a seat on the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. Paul is also a member of the Senate's new tea party caucus. Paul's appointment, obviously, isn't curtains for 400 Maryland Ave. But Paul is going to be a tough customer who probably won't rush to sign off on the administration's ideas for ESEA renewal. The committee still has a number of GOP moderates though, including new member Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois. Here's the full list of folks on the Senate Education Committee: Democrats: Sens. Tom Harkin of Iowa (who is ...


George Will on Arne Duncan: He's the Obama administration's redeeming feature.


A day after the State of the Union speech, the education secretary and members of the Senate's "Big 8" on education policy say they want to move swiftly to make changes to the nine-year-old law.


Nearly all the folks I spoke to after the State of the Union (including ESEA VIP Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.) were on message that the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act can be a chance for both parties to come together. And there were other signs that lawmakers want to send a message that education is something they can all work together on. Moments after the speech, Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, introduced a joint statement with Sen. Mike Enzi, the top Republican on the panel, saying basically, ...


The president calls on Congress to renew the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, tying his education proposals directly to the nation's economic future.


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