The closely watched Delaware Senate contest scored another straight-to-YouTube moment yesterday.


The midterms are almost here! And education is starting to come up in some of the senatorial debates. Out in Nevada, Sen. Harry Reid, the Democratic majority leader, and GOP challenger Sharron Angle discussed the federal role for K-12. You can view their exchange on the Democratic-leaning Huffington Post. Angle said the Education Department makes "one-size-fits-all policy" that benefits no one and skims off money form schools. She said that schools have gotten worse since the department was established 30ish years ago. Reid calls the Department of Education "the Department of Energy" (oops!) but says Nevadans really rely on programs ...


Politics K-12 points out good reads from across the web, along with an education candidate whose name hints she might know the future of school reform.


Arne Duncan and the presidents of the national teachers' unions just announced plans for a summit to show the world that unions and managers can indeed get along. Really.


The NEA is stepping up its game with new ads designed to protect some vulnerable Democrats.


Come election night, most folks watching federal races will be paying attention to the big questions (Does the House of Representatives flip to Republican control? What about the Senate?) But there are some individual races that could also matter. A handful of Democrats on the House Education and Labor Committee are on the endangered list, or at least may have a tough fight ahead of them. While education may not be a signature issue in these members' races, their losses could alter the makeup of the panel, no matter who retains control of Congress. That could impact the issues they ...


Kerri Briggs, who served as the assistant secretary of elementary and secondary education under President George W. Bush, is now serving as the new program director of education reform for the George W. Bush Institute (which recently launched a big principal training initiative.) After leaving the department, Briggs served as state superintendent for the Washington, D.C. public schools, where she worked on the district's successful Race to the Top application. While serving in the department, Briggs helped implement the No Child Left Behind Act and she'll continue to work on "reform-based principles of accountability" at the Bush Institute, according ...


This was supposed to be the year in which Congress finally reauthorized the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, which was supposed to be rewritten back in 2007. Almost everyone sees problems with the current law, but so far, there hasn't even been a formal bill introduced remaking it. (Just a doomed discussion draft, introduced by Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., back in 2007.) Now it looks like Republicans are going to take the House of Representatives and maybe even the Senate. And the question is...might they be able to work with the Obama administration to get ESEA done ...


The NEA is putting its formidable get-out-the-vote and campaigning efforts behind five high-priority U.S. Senate races and 22 House races.


Education, which is usually pretty low on the list of hot campaign issues, is getting some traction in this congressional midterm-election season. President Barack Obama appears to have incorporated the charge that Republicans would cut education spending by 20 percent into his current stump speech. GOP leaders have said that's not the case. And the White House has planned a high-profile event touting the administration's accomplishments on community colleges, which some see as the latest and greatest economic engine. Now education is even coming up in some campaign commercials. The latest example? The Colorado Senate race, which probably wins the ...


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