Count the National Education Association as a fan (for the most part) of the No Child Left Behind Act renewal bill put forth last month by Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.

If some folks had their way, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's proposed rules about school meals, in particular the part about potatoes, might be better off without a section limiting starchy veggies.

Some district officials would rather see increases for Title I grants for disadvantaged kids and special education than new money for the Obama reform priorities, including Race to the Top.

The American Jobs Act would save nearly 400,000 jobs, if states spent all the money in one year, according to a report released today by the White House.

The latest $30 million in grants to help schools and non-profits work together on wraparound services drew 234 applicants.

The legislation would create two funding streams. One would be aimed at improving teaching and learning, and the other would seek to bolster student health and safety.

Key formula programs would get huge increases, but big Obama priorities would get the axe under a fiscal 2012 spending plan from the House panel overseeing K-12 funding.

The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Oct. 18 plans to consider a measure reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Based on the guidebook released by the U.S. Department of Education, peer reviewers will have to make important judgments about the quality of states' plans for waivers under No Child Left Behind.

The National Education Association is running ads backing the president's plan to provide $30 billion for education jobs and $25 billion for school modernization and repair.

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