Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., had this message in an appearance before Kentucky legislators: Assume you can do as you please under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Dozens of educators and advocates offered the U.S. Department of Education their thoughts on how testing and an "innovative assessment" pilot should work under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The list of experts in her education policy working group run the gamut from folks who are arguably sympathetic to the education redesign wing of the party to the presidents of both national teachers' unions.


The GOP presidential nominee says he'd be the "nation's biggest cheerleader for school choice" and would offer states the chance to use $20 billion in federal money to create vouchers.


Donald Trump recently proposed ending federal spending caps on the military. How could that impact what Washington spends on public schools?


Thirty-five years ago this week, in its very first issue, Education Week published details of a memo written by the Education Secretary taking aim at the department itself.


With the Every Student Succeeds Act on the books, many believe the next president won't be able to put a big stamp on federal K-12 policy. Let's examine that assumption.


It's that time again! The U.S. Secretary of Education will be embarking on the department's annual back-to-school bus tour.


Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump told an American Legion convention Thursday that he wants school children to regularly say the pledge of allegiance, and learn patriotism. He's also recently said the nation could use the money it spends on undocumented immigrants on school choice.


The Education Department aims to give districts and states added flexibility in use of funds to aid low-income students, but not enough to mollify its sharpest critics in Washington.


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