The Republican budget plan would cut U.S. Department of Education funding to $4.9 billion below the fiscal 2010 level of $63.7 billion, including cuts to special education and Pell Grants.


Look for education as a bright spot in an austere budget, and a sequel with a twist we could call Race to the Top: The Locals Strike Back


Three things were obvious after the new GOPed-up House education committee held its first hearing on education.


A huge shortfall in the program to help low-income students attend college could cause aftershocks for other domestic programs, including education.


For U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, local school board members can be a really tough crowd. Last year, the National School Boards Association members gave Duncan grief after he tangled with them over his support of mayoral control. Not dissuaded, Duncan came back today to address the same crowd, whose members have come to grips with the new federal education reality. And many of them don't really like it. (They didn't really like their reality under former EdSec Margaret Spellings either.) In his speech, Duncan had nothing really new to say, choosing instead to reiterate past accomplishments (think ...


The two lawmakers, well known for their K-12 expertise, will take newly prominent roles in the negotiations.


Judy Wurtzel, the deputy assistant secretary for planning, evaluation and policy development, is leaving the U.S. Department of Education to focus on "family and work part-time," she wrote in an email to colleagues yesterday. Today is her last day at the department, where she worked under Assistant Secretary Carmel Martin and helped shape the department's school improvement strategy. "The past two years have been extraordinary for the Department and for education reform across the country. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to contribute to this effort," wrote Wurtzel, who served as the executive director of the Aspen ...


Two years ago this month Congress passed the economic stimulus package, infusing the nation's schools with an additional $100 billion and providing an endless source of intrigue for us @ Politics K-12. While it may seem like a lot of the stimulus fun is over—you know, Race to the Top awards have been handed out, people are coming to grips with the four turnaround models—I think the fun (if you can call it that) is just beginning. And that's because we need to start asking: Where did all of that money go? In my quest to start answering...


If Congress doesn't move on reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act this year, states are poised to get going on their own ideas on accountability and other areas.


Congress Geeks, clear your calendars! Next Thursday, the House Education and the Workforce Committee is planning to hold the very first hearing on the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act since the House of Representatives flipped to GOP control and Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., became the committee chairman. The title of the hearing is pretty expansive. It's called Education in the Nation: Examining the Challenges and Opportunities Facing America's Classrooms. The hearing will give members a broad overview of the issues facing K-12 schools, including the federal role in education policy, a spokesman for the panel told me. ...


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