Check out my interview with Margot Rogers, who is leaving her post as Arne Duncan's chief of staff after 18 months. She's giving up her Blackberry and hitting the beach for the summer before figuring out what's next. And given her extensive education policy background, Rogers should have no problem landing a plum gig. Her one big regret? Not sticking around to see ESEA get reauthorized. (But can anyone blame her for not waiting? Reauthorization might still be a long way off...)...


I'm sure you've heard by now that the White House, which some folks said wasn't going after the edujobs money with sufficient gusto, sent a letter, on a weekend no less, to congressional leaders asking them to please pass legislation to stave off what some warn could be 300,000 teacher layoffs. A couple of things to note here: *The version of the edujobs bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives in December, was set to provide $23 billion, but the letter doesn't specify an amount. Still, published reports say this is an ask for $50 billion in ...


First it was Richard Simmons, getting Congress to exercise. Now Rachael Ray is lending her star power to the House Education and Labor Committee's effort to revamp school nutrition programs. Apparently, she thinks a bill introduced today by Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., the chairman of the committee, is yummo and delish. Ray, who participated up in a press conference on Capitol Hill today to roll out the legislation, asked the audience to imagine what it is like for a child to go hungry. "The difference an apple or a good school lunch makes to these kids ... it's more than just ...


The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which was a major force behind the stepped up federal accountability in the No Child Left Behind law, has tapped former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings to serve as the new head of its education programs. In case you've been living under a rock, Spellings was a key architect of the NCLB law when she served as President George W. Bush's domestic-policy adviser. As secretary of education, she introduced substantial new flexibility into the law and also racked up some major international frequent-flyer miles. Spellings, who will be replacing Arthur Rothkopf, has ...


Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., a former Denver schools chief, who is said to be the administration's go-to guy on education issues, just dropped this bill aimed at helping states and districts build capacity to turn around low-performing schools. Unlike a proposal by Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., which would completely reject the administration's four turnaround models outlined in the School Improvement Grants, the Bennet proposal is more about training school leaders to do turnaround work and spurring more research on how to intervene in struggling schools. The bill would create a School Leadership Academy, which would be charged with developing a ...


She will leave the helm of the high-profile competition to take over as Education Secretary Arne Duncan's chief of staff.


The Senate education committee's panel on children and families will be examining a variety of issues affecting children's lives.


So tonight, some very lucky students in Kalamazoo, Michigan are going to have their commencement address delivered by none other than President Barack Obama. And although I doubt Obama will talk much about union side deals and other education policy inside baseball, it's not surprising that the administration is using the hoopla surrounding the speech as an opportunity to tout its progress on major education redesign achievements - and to lay some groundwork for the administration's priorities as Congress begins to consider the fiscal year 2011 education spending bill. Chief on that list? The competition for a slice of the $4...


Florida's Race to the Top application and the so-called side deals that districts and unions are entering into on their own—outside of the official application—are raising some eyebrows among education policy wonks. It's really unclear just how problematic these side deals might be to the spirit of the Race to the Top competition in Florida, but they sure do raise a lot of questions. Eduwonk, Sherman Dorn, State EdWatch, The Washington Post's Answer Sheet, and this blog have all explored the ramifications of these side deals. Now, the U.S. Department of Education is weighing in late Friday...


My colleague Lesli Maxwell highlighted over at State EdWatch a disturbing trend in Florida, where some districts and their local teachers' unions are signing side deals that seem to fly in the face of the spirit of the Race to the Top competition. Intrepid St. Pete Times reporter Ron Matus first wrote about the issue here, and has since uncovered more side deals. UPDATE: Blogger Sherman Dorn writes this is much ado about nothing—that the MOUs districts signed and these side deals are really quite similar. Florida improved its round two application by getting 54 local unions on board...


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