The interesting part for K-12 is the funding set aside for school facilities, or about $4 billion over two years.


So, remember that listening-and-learning tour that U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan embarked on to get a sense of what Americans think of the No Child Left Behind Act? Well, he took the tour to the airwaves (sort of) earlier this week, holding a national town hall meeting that was televised in many places. Check it out online here. There wasn't much said at Tuesday's event that was new to me. The criticisms he heard of NCLB were important, but relatively predictable (too much testing, too much focus on the core subjects at the expense of physical education, art, ...


He's running in 2010 to be a "turnaround governor," an obvious slam on the term-limited and controversial Republican Gov. Mark Sanford.


The House of Representatives is set to consider this legislation as early as tomorrow that would significantly expand the federal direct lending program, in which students borrow right from the U.S. Treasury. And it would effectively end the Federal Family Education Loan Program, which uses subsidized lenders. That's the controversial part of the legislation, but it's not the part that's most interesting for K-12 education. The bill also includes major new investments in community colleges, which could be used for dual enrollment programs, a brand-new prekindergarten grant program, plus funding for school facilities. It would pay for those new ...


Though the Eduwonk blog will live on, Rotherham will leave in the spring the think tank he co-founded.


Is Arne Duncan softening his stance on mayoral control? This and more good reads...


Schools and community organizations that want to use K-12 facilities for mentoring, academic enrichment, and health services could get an assist from the federal government under a bill introduced yesterday by Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md., the House Majority Leader, and Sen. Ben Nelson of Nebraska, a moderate Democrat who is often a key swing vote. The bill would be aimed at expanding the reach of "full-service community schools." It would help schools, community organizations, and private-public partnerships offer a whole range of programs, including remedial education and academic enrichment, family literacy, mental health, adult education, nutrition services, and early childhood ...


Observers say he may push back on some of the Obama administration's K-12 priorities.


This means that the Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, the second ranking Democrat on the committee, has a chance to step in.


Wakefield High School students call the speech flap "pointless" and "kind of dumb."


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