The Education Department aims to give districts and states added flexibility in use of funds to aid low-income students, but not enough to mollify its sharpest critics in Washington.


The vast majority of states don't give their schools much of an incentive to bolster achievement for the most advanced students, according to a report released Wednesday by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a think tank in Washington.


"This finding, perhaps more than any other, exemplifies the divide between the reform agenda of the past 16 years and the actual desires of the American public," a PDK poll analysis said.


Rob Goad is on leave from Rep. Luke Messer's office and is currently in New York City working for the Trump campaign, according to sources.


The dispute began in 2011, when the U.S. Department of Education threatened to withhold in future years more than $112 million from South Carolina.


U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., is apparently a fan of Ken Burns' documentary "The Civil War" and thinks they can do the job typically done by teachers.


Can't get enough of public comments about proposed accountability regulations under the Every Student Succeeds Act? Here's some additional voices from the trove that now tops 21,000.


A look at previous federal guidance and proposals may offers clues to the Education Department's thinking as it prepares to issue spending rules under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


"Fault Lines: America's Most Segregating School District Borders" looks at student-poverty rates between adjacent districts, and examined more than 33,500 such district boundaries.


An analysis of the results from Education Next argues that it's hard to understand why members of the public are generally pleased with their local schools, given America's relative performance on international tests.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments