After getting feedback from NGA and CCSSO, the Gates Foundation changes course.


Remember the compromise Congress came up with on school facilities in order to pass the economic-stimulus package? Proponents decided to ditch the billions in school construction grants to win support from moderate lawmakers for the overall stimulus. Instead, school districts were allowed to use a portion of their State Fiscal Stabilization Fund money (whatever was leftover after backfilling cuts) for school modernization, along with a whole bunch of other options. Have any of them actually been able to take advantage of that? As we've written before, most of the $39 billion in state stabilization funding went to make up for ...


The former high school science teacher will have the same gig, just a different office--in the White House's Domestic Policy Council.


The National Education Association, which is pouring money and manpower into the effort led by Democrats to overhaul the health care system, is less than thrilled with the new bill released earlier this week by the Senate Finance Committee. The nation's largest union put out a statement today saying that the proposal "does not meet the guidelines set by President Obama in his speech to Congress last week. The bill fails to provide affordable coverage for the 46 million uninsured through a public option, and will raise costs even more for middle-income workers." In addition to the affordability issue, NEA ...


The interesting part for K-12 is the funding set aside for school facilities, or about $4 billion over two years.


So, remember that listening-and-learning tour that U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan embarked on to get a sense of what Americans think of the No Child Left Behind Act? Well, he took the tour to the airwaves (sort of) earlier this week, holding a national town hall meeting that was televised in many places. Check it out online here. There wasn't much said at Tuesday's event that was new to me. The criticisms he heard of NCLB were important, but relatively predictable (too much testing, too much focus on the core subjects at the expense of physical education, art, ...


He's running in 2010 to be a "turnaround governor," an obvious slam on the term-limited and controversial Republican Gov. Mark Sanford.


The House of Representatives is set to consider this legislation as early as tomorrow that would significantly expand the federal direct lending program, in which students borrow right from the U.S. Treasury. And it would effectively end the Federal Family Education Loan Program, which uses subsidized lenders. That's the controversial part of the legislation, but it's not the part that's most interesting for K-12 education. The bill also includes major new investments in community colleges, which could be used for dual enrollment programs, a brand-new prekindergarten grant program, plus funding for school facilities. It would pay for those new ...


Though the Eduwonk blog will live on, Rotherham will leave in the spring the think tank he co-founded.


Is Arne Duncan softening his stance on mayoral control? This and more good reads...


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments