Texas Democrats are fighting what's perhaps a noble, albeit losing, battle over State Fiscal Stabilization Fund money that's designed to help prop up states' K-12 education budgets. Texas Gov. Rick Perry and fellow Republicans have figured out, like a lot of other states, that even if you don't really need to cut education, you can cut K-12 anyway and fill the cuts with federal stimulus money, thereby freeing up money for other government programs that would have been spent on education. In one case, Democrats fought a valiant and creative fight as members of the Texas congressional delegation threatened to ...


Rep. John Kline of Minnesota is the new top Republican on the House Education and Labor Committee. Kline wasn't in Congress back in 2001, when lawmakers approved the No Child Left Behind Act, so it's unclear whether he would have supported the legislation. But, unlike Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon of California, who held the ranking member position until he became the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee, Kline is a co-sponsor of this bill, put forth by Rep. Peter Hoekstra of Michigan. Commonly called the A-plus Act, the legislation would allow states to "opt-out" of NCLB's accountability ...


AFT President Randi Weingarten has written about the need for national academic standards and testified about it on Capitol Hill. But, in a wide-ranging interview with Edweek reporters yesterday, she was less than enthusiastic about Secretary of Education Arne Duncan's proposal to use a portion of the Race to the Top fund to help states develop more uniform, rigorous assessments. I asked her if she supported the idea, and she said the "short answer is yes" but that the "devil is in the details", a Washington response if there ever was one. Weingarten isn't known for her brevity, particularly in ...


The Republican singles out a Rhode Island school's new skate park, a Wisconsin district's school lunch equipment, and Detroit Public Schools in general for questionable stimulus spending.


But she doesn't mention Education Secretary Arne Duncan by name.


Applications from states will be due in December and June.


The Race to the Top Fund is now down to $4 billion for states.


Not content with prodding California to tear down its data fire wall, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is apparently throwing his weight around the fight over whether, and how, to continue mayoral control of New York City's schools. And, over at Flypaper, Mike Petrilli takes the temperature of Duncan's tenure so far: It's a "warm" on the blog's trademark Reform-o-meter. Which, sadly, won't be a regular feature anymore, Mike says. At Swift & Change Able, Charlie Barone has an interesting update on the implementation of growth models and No Child Left Behind. And if you were wondering why there hasn't been ...


What's up with certain conservatives linking sex and kindergarten?


As we mentioned yesterday, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is talking tough about the need for state data systems to include some sort of indicator that can be used to tie teachers to their students' performance. Who knows whether it will happen in California, Duncan's new poster child for the issue. But the situation in Arizona may be promising for proponents of the idea, at least according to the state schools chief, Tom Horne. I asked Horne last week (while reporting this story) whether he thought the state would actually be able to squeeze some reform out of the stimulus ...


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