No one may be more interested in the idea of a federal investment in school construction than communities where federal facilities have a large footprint.


There was less attention on education in this year's speech than any similar joint address to Congress dating back to 1989, a review by the Education Week library found.


President Donald Trump used his first State of the Union address to call on Congress to create a path of citizenship for "Dreamers" and to provide big new funding for infrastructure, but he made almost no mention of K-12 schools.


Congress is still wrestling with a basic question: How to use educational data to improve schools, without further jeopardizing student privacy?


School choice, immigration, career and technical education, and early-childhood are among the topics ripe for a mention as President Donald Trump speaks to a joint session of Congress.


The island and its school system were already struggling with dire financial problems before Hurricane Maria struck. Last summer, Puerto Rico's education department closed 179 schools


The deal, outlined by White House officials with members of Congress, could shield from deportation those currently covered by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.


The Trump administration's budget is likely to combine three significant research programs--the State Longitudinal Data System program, the Regional Educational Laboratory Program, and the Comprehensive Centers--advocates with knowledge of the proposal said.


Democrats used the hearing on Frank Brogan, nominee for assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, to lambaste Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act.


Education Secretary Betsy DeVos urged those at a meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors to help forge connections among K-12, postsecondary education, and the business community.


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