President-elect Donald Trump also will work to ensure "a new way of how to deliver public education," said Gerard Robinson, a former Florida and Virginia state chief.


Although public school policy wasn't a particularly big issue during the 2016 campaign, Congress could still get very busy when it comes to education in general.


The real estate executive has largely ignored education during his successful presidential bid, except for a $20 billion federal investment in school choice he announced in September.


The National Education Associated reported that seven times more members volunteered this election season than back in 2012.


Public school policy has mostly been ignored in the race for the White House, and sadly for many of you education wonks, not much has changed. But it is voting day, so we've got a quick refresher for you on the candidates' education policies.


Over two dozen GOP members of Congress want the U.S. Department of Education to rescind its proposed spending rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The proposed ESSA rules say this: "Nothing in this section should be construed to require the forced or involuntary transfer of any school personnel."


From 1951 to 1955, the FBI distributed intelligence reports about those suspected as political subversives to governors, police departments, Red Cross officials, and other prominent civic leaders.


A bipartisan group of U.S. senators wrote to the president in September criticizing proposed Education Department rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act, which passed by overwhelming margins last year.


Just like in the real presidential contest, there were sharp divides along racial lines in a mock presidential election conducted by the ed-tech company Newsela.


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