The decision to make states ineligible for grants if they don't permit the use of student achievement data for evaluating teachers went all the way to the Oval Office.


The Obama administration gave a thumbs up to the increase for the Teacher Incentive Fund, and a thumbs down to lawmakers' decision not to boost funding for the Title I school improvement grants by $1 billion.


There are new proposed requirements on how states should show progress toward those four education-improvement areas spelled out in the stimulus law.


The most talked about, written about, and speculated about part of the stimulus, the $4.35 billion Race to the Top fund, is getting top billing across the edu-blogsphere today.


The Education Department has unveiled criteria for deciding who will get a slice of the $4 billion Race to the Top fund.


The word on the street (and by street, I mean twitter) is that the Race to the Top application process is going to be announced as soon as tomorrow. (The folks at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a think-tank in Washington, are saying it outright.) The $4.35 billion Race to the Top program, which was created under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, is meant to reward states that make significant progress on teacher quality and distribution, standards and assessments, school improvement, and tracking student progress through data systems. Folks are wondering just how serious the Education Department is ...


The Education Department's Office of Inspector General looked for patterns in its investigations since 2002 and found pervasive problems with spending federal money.


Without many fireworks or much fanfare, the House Education and Labor Committee approved a bill that would completely overhaul the federal student-loan program, using projected savings to direct new resources to school facilities, early-childhood education, Pell Grants, and community colleges. The measure was approved on a partisan vote of 30-17, with just two Republicans, Reps. Todd Platts of Pennsylvania and Thomas Petri of Wisconsin, crossing over to vote with the Democrats. The committee approved a few tweaks to the portion of the bill on early-childhood education, including amendments that would allow the government to take into consideration when doling out ...


Title I districts would get grants of at least $5,000 under the proposal to use for projects that meet environmental standards.


How would you improve the Education Department's Web site?


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments