From guest blogger Erik Robelen: His office may be smaller, but Marshall (Mike) S. Smith, a veteran education official from the Clinton era, is back at 400 Maryland Ave. in downtown Washington. As of last month, Smith has returned to the Education Department's headquarters as a senior adviser to Secretary Arne Duncan. “I’m working with a team on the implementation of the stimulus package, which is a big part of my time, and other duties as requested by the secretary,” said Smith, who served as both the undersecretary and acting deputy secretary at the federal agency for seven years ...


Obama set a new goal--that by 2020, the United States will have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.


See how states and districts can spend their stabilization dollars.


After the excitement of the stimulus, Congress is finally getting back around to the regular budget bill for this fiscal year, which started back on Oct. 1.


The Democrats for Education Reform's stimulus suggestions give a good indication of how the school reform crowd might want the feds to use the stimulus dollars to leverage change.


Here's our second installment of answers to your stimulus questions.


Politics K-12's own Michele McNeil will be on C-SPAN's "Newsmakers" program this weekend interviewing Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, along with the Associated Press' Libby Quaid. (Quaid along with Edweek's Steve Sawchuk and Dakarai Aarons, landed a coveted spot on Alexander Russo's Hot For Education list). Michele asked Duncan when the department would be sending out the stimulus checks to states and school districts (probably the number one question on school officials' minds). Duncan said districts would be receiving their money and guidance as soon as possible. And Michele pressed him on whether the Department could enforce the teacher effectiveness ...


The education department has estimates on how much each school district will get from the stimulus package in Title I and special education funding.


Linda Darling-Hammond, who was widely rumored for a top job in the U.S. Department of Education, told me today that she is going to stay in California and support President Barack Obama's agenda in her role as an education professor and researcher at Stanford University. Darling-Hammond, who has done extensive research on teacher quality and international benchmarking, said she will be working to establish a new policy center at the University that will examine a variety of education redesign issues, including standards and assessments, teacher quality, and educational equity in the U.S. and abroad. She has also been ...


The Sunshine State is one of a handful that says it can't meet the maintenance of effort requirements in the economic stimulus package, which mandate that states keep education funding at 2006 levels in order to receive the cash. The law allows U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to waive maintenance of effort requirements for states that are in particularly dire fiscal straits. On a conference call last week with the media, an Education Department consultant told a reporter from Florida that the department wasn't going to issue blanket waivers and was going to look at each state on ...


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