DeVos used a speech Wednesday to what was billed by organizers as the biggest gathering of conservative high school-aged activists in recent history to make the case for her signature policy: school choice.


Momentum behind reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act has grown in recent weeks, after a lobbying effort by the Trump administration on Capitol Hill.


Trauma-informed care and state support for mental health paid off big in Wisconsin, state and local officials told U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos and other members of the Federal School Safety Commission at a field hearing.


The Democrats announced that their legislation would be a "sweeping reauthorization" of the nation's Higher Education Act. So what's in the bill?


Last reauthorized in 2006, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act is a $1.1 billion program that provides grants to states.


ESSA, like its predecessor, the No Child Left Behind Act, requires states to test students in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school, in math and reading. But who foots the bill?


The "National Council of the American Worker" created by President Donald Trump's executive order will be made up of senior administration officials and will develop strategy to train and retrain employees for high-demand industries.


The Urban Institute projects a decline of more than 25 percent in the proportion of overall federal funding that will go to education and other benefits for children over the next decade, the Urban Institute says.


Jim Blew, the former director of Student Success California, an education advocacy group, has officially been confirmed by the U.S. Senate to lead the office of planning, evaluation, and policy analysis at the U.S. Department of Education. Blew has been serving at the department in an advisory capacity.


The Trump administration may soon get its wish when it comes to one of its major education policy priorities: a Senate-approved overhaul of federal career and technical education law.


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