Advocates for education have a new, big posse to help fight those automatic spending cuts known as "sequestration" which are set to hit almost every federal program on January 2 unless Congress comes up with some sort of big, sweeping deal to stop them.


The Center on Education Policy takes a deep look at the challenges facing those participating in the federal School Improvement Grant Program.


School district administrators and the National Education Association raise dire warnings about across-the-board federal education spending cuts set for early January if Congress doesn't head them off.


State Superintendent John D. Barge doesn't think the teacher effectiveness plan as currently written, is workable.


The two approvals bring the total of approved states to 26, meaning that more than half the states are no longer subject to the accountability system at the heart of the much-maligned NCLB law.


Alabama, Alaska, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, and West Virginia can join Iowa in hitting the pause button on their AMOs for the coming school year while they work on their waiver plans.


If Georgia is unable to address the Education Department's concerns, it could loose roughly $33 million of its $400 million, the portion dedicated to implementing the


In case you hadn't heard, a federal judge struck down a key component of the U.S. Department of Education's controversial "gainful employment"—affecting for-profit colleges—over the weekend.


This is the first time the department has done a "pre-application" for the "development" grants, the smallest, but most sought after the i3 grants.


Five more states, including Virginia--a state that did not sign onto the Common Core State Standards--have received wiggle room from the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act.


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