Former Arizona State Schools Superintendent Lisa Graham Keegan offers a very revealing quote in the Arizona Republic, which writes about how she's jumping on board John McCain's presidential campaign full-time. "Having Senator McCain be in a position to get ready to start talking about education a little bit more fully in his campaign, it's just a great opportunity to be a part of," Keegan said. In a position? To get ready? To start talking about education? A little bit? More fully? The election is only six months away! Mike Petrilli at Fordham's Flypaper seems to see this as a good ...


ED in '08 Chairman and superdelegate Roy Romer today announced he is endorsing Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois for president. (Hat tip to Flypaper on this one.) Romer, a former Colorado governor and Democratic National Chairman, leads the nonpartisan ED in '08 group that's trying to make education a prominent issue in the election. To be sure, Romer isn't saying ED in '08 is endorsing Obama. In this ABC News story, he says: "My partner here, Marc Lampkin is a Bush Republican, a McCain Republican, so we are still one Democrat and one Republican who will be working even handedly." (Lampkin...


Who else, besides me, is going to the ED in '08 blogger summit? While the substance of the summit is on Thursday, the gathering kicks off tomorrow night with cocktails, appetizers, and a screening of the documentary Two Million Minutes. I'm not quite sure what to expect from this summit, but I'm sure it will be interesting. On tap is Newt Gingrich, and bloggers Joanne Jacobs, Dan Brown, and Alexander Russo, among others. Yours truly will be on a panel called "Blogging the Election: Breaking Through the Noise."...


Here at EdWeek and Campaign K-12, we've been trying to get a list of John McCain's education advisers, but with little success. Thankfully, (insert sarcasm here), someone has leaked the list to the good folks at Fordham. A few of the advisers are crossovers from Mitt Romney's camp, including former education department officials William D. Hansen and Eugene W. Hickok. And we've known that former Arizona state superintendent Lisa Graham Keegan was on the list. Also filling McCain's education bench is Williamson Evers, who has amassed a list of enemies who may have helped briefly stall his Senate confirmation last ...


From contributing blogger Alyson Klein: One of my beats here at Education Week is the federal budget. And this year, Congress has been unusually sluggish (even for Congress) at getting going on education spending bills. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings hasn't even testified in the Senate yet on President Bush's education budget proposal - an event that usually happens in early spring. Congress is dragging its feet on appropriations legislation, particularly the controversial bill that finances education, in part because they don't want to go through another veto-dance with President Bush. Democrats are betting if the next president is from ...


Take a minute to read Greg Anrig's comment that further explains his reasoning that conservatives have abandoned the voucher movement. He responded to a blog item I did questioning his recent article in the Washington Monthly. Anrig makes a good argument. But I still think that while conservatives may have abandoned economist Milton Friedman's idea for vouchers from a strict interpretation standpoint, they've merely shifted their political strategies and are trying to accomplish the same thing without calling it "vouchers." Checker Finn weighs in with a similar argument here, saying that Anrig has been "overhasty" and that "choice is winning." ...


The Century Foundation's Greg Anrig penned a piece in Washington Monthly recently titled: "An Idea Whose Time Has Gone". And the subheadline reads: "Conservatives abandon their support for school vouchers." If you can't figure it out from the headline, the gist is that the voucher movement is dead or dying, and conservatives have given up hope. While vouchers aren't explicitly campaign related, the issue is volatile and polarizing enough that it often crops up in state and local races—and even Barack Obama has mentioned the "V" word before. And while I don't want to argue the merits of vouchers ...


A few weeks ago, I profiled the efforts of Brian Griffin, a campaign intern for Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois, and other high-schoolers who lent a hand to one of the two Democrats vying in yesterday’s closely watched Indiana presidential primary. Griffin saw the victory by Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York in a broad context. “It was upsetting that we worked so hard here and we didn’t actually see the percentages being higher,” he said, referring to the roughly 2-point margin over Obama. But he added, “You can’t get too upset when you see that ...


Now that Obama seems poised to wrap up the Democratic nomination with a victory in North Carolina and a narrow miss in Indiana, the pundits are starting to examine where Obama goes now. And if he wants to win, that means Obama needs to start pivoting to the center, some say. Fordham's Mike Petrilli writes on Flypaper about what that could mean for his education policy stances. As a personal aside, I have to say that I was surprised that Obama did as well as he did in Indiana. I was expecting Hillary Clinton to more soundly beat him, and ...


Sen. John McCain of Arizona, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, gave a speech today at Wake Forest University designed to outline his judicial views in which he cited a famous legal challenge to the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in schools. The campaign put out this press release, as well as the text of his remarks. He says that if given the opportunity, he will appoint U.S. Supreme Court justices in the mold of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. McCain cited cases in which he thinks courts have run amok by ...


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