Kevin Jennings, was appointed to his job at the helm of the U.S. Department of Education's office of safe and drug free schools more than three months ago, amid criticism from some socially conservative groups that sought to derail the appointment. Now, some controversial statements he made years ago to a gay student are stirring up those critics once again. Warren Throckmorton, a conservative psychology professor at Grove City College in Pennsylvania, and an independent blogger, recently posted an audio interview on his Web site, in which Jennings recounts that while he was a high school teacher he told ...


Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colorado, a former Denver schools chief, has taken the slot on the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee made vacant by the death of Sen. Edward M. Kennnedy, D-Mass. Bennet's move has got to be good news for Democrats who support policies such as alternative pay and charter schools (including these folks). They have high hopes that Bennet, with his real-world, on-the-ground experience, could help fill the void on education issues in the Senate created by Kennedy's passing. Bennet, who seems particularly interested in teacher quality, is said to be one of the Obama administration's Senate ...


States are still waiting for the final rules for the $4 billion Race to the Top grant program, which is meant to reward states for helping to close the achievement gap. In the meantime, the U.S. House of Representatives has taken the concept (big, highly coveted pot of competitive money that the feds can use to prod states to adopt certain policies) and gone all P-16 with it. Using some of the $87 billion in projected savings that would be freed up by a major overhaul to the student loan program, the House is looking to create three new ...


Join us for an online chat today at 2 p.m. about the common standards movement, now being undertaken by 48 states.


For the first time ever, gambling revenue is down in states by 2.8 percent. And that has implications for K-12.


More than 200 advocates from a wide range of groups packed the U.S. Department of Education today to hear Secretary of Education Arne Duncan outline his priorities for the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act -- better known over the last eight years as the No Child Left Behind Act. Duncan didn't say anything he hasn't said before, but he used the high-profile forum to stress some priorities, including extended learning time, using data to track student and teacher effectiveness, and systems to better measure individual student progress. (That's code for growth models, which are expected to ...


It sounds as if the Department of Education is ready to get rolling on reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. On Thursday, Secretary Arne Duncan will do the "inside the Beltway" version of his listening and learning tour.


Those identified as "high risk" for possible stimulus spending problems are California, Illinois, Michigan, and Texas. D.C. and Puerto Rico also made the list.


After getting feedback from NGA and CCSSO, the Gates Foundation changes course.


Remember the compromise Congress came up with on school facilities in order to pass the economic-stimulus package? Proponents decided to ditch the billions in school construction grants to win support from moderate lawmakers for the overall stimulus. Instead, school districts were allowed to use a portion of their State Fiscal Stabilization Fund money (whatever was leftover after backfilling cuts) for school modernization, along with a whole bunch of other options. Have any of them actually been able to take advantage of that? As we've written before, most of the $39 billion in state stabilization funding went to make up for ...


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