Given the problems that have befallen New York's caped crusader against corruption, Eliot "Client No. 9" Spitzer, it seems appropriate to examine what's at stake for education, and the guy who might replace him. New York is at a pivotal point in education, as Gov. Spitzer has championed and succeeded in investing more money in public schools—prompted by court rulings declaring that the state wasn't spending enough money to provide kids with an adequate education. At the same time, he's demanded accountability in exchange for that money. There's no indication Democrat Lt. Gov. David Paterson (pictured) would halt the ...


...from Lisa Graham Keegan, a former Arizona state schools chief who will start devoting more time to Sen. John McCain's campaign as one of his education policy advisers, according to this Arizona Republic story. Already part of a team of five education advisers, Keegan will take on a greater, more time-consuming role now that McCain is the GOP nominee. Note in the story that even his education advisers haven't spent much time talking about education issues with Sen. McCain, who has largely avoided the issue on the campaign trail....


...then you must add this story to your reading list: "The Lost Years," written by my colleague Mary Ann Zehr, who traveled to Jordan to chronicle the lives of Iraqi children who fled their war-torn country. If you think the war in Iraq is just about bombs and oil and fighting terrorism and getting out as quickly as we can, then this is a heart-wrenching eye-opener about the devastating affects of war on a child's education. You don't hear the candidates talk much about this when they speak of the Iraq war. Also good reads: Mike Petrilli and Checker Finn ...


Here’s some inside baseball on those retirements of congressional Republicans I wrote about earlier this week: Their departures may have an impact on the bottom-line for some education programs. A number of the retiring Republicans have helped control the purse strings for education as members of the House Appropriations subcommittee overseeing education spending. In fact, four out of the six regular GOP members of the panel are retiring. The retiring members are: Rep. James T. Walsh of New York, the ranking member on the subcommittee overseeing education funding. He's been a supporter of funding for special education , offering an ...


Now that John McCain is the Republican nominee for president, a lot of people are paying far more attention to what he says on the campaign trail. And although he doesn't talk much about education, he may have stepped on a landmine when he waded into the controversial area of what causes autism. Specifically, he said there's "strong evidence" that a preservative in vaccines is causing autism. What strong evidence? As my colleague Christina Samuels points out in her blog post, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say there is no link. For more on this and other special ...


What an election night! Two candidates who, at one point or another, were practically relegated to the political graveyard had big nights. Some education highlights: Alexander Russo wonders whether Sen. Barack Obama's wishy-washy stance on private school vouchers hurt him in Ohio, which is home both to powerful teachers' unions and a state-funded voucher program in Cleveland. Obama, in his speech last night in Texas, pledges that no child should attend school where there are more rats than computers. And finally, we must bid farewell to former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, the affable Republican who actually made education a campaign ...


When I read my colleague David Hoff's post about Barack Obama's views that No Child Left Behind has "narrowed" the curriculum, my eyes bugged out at one line in The Hoff's post: "He (Obama) also suggested that testing should happen at the beginning of the school year so the results can help the teacher and that accountability decisions should be made based on student growth." Believe it or not, spring versus fall testing was one of the most contentious education issues in the Indiana Statehouse, and one I wrote about often for The Indianapolis Star. Many years ago, Indiana's standardized ...


This is from guest blogger and EdWeek assistant managing editor Mark Walsh, who took a break from his own blog on education law to provide this Campaign K-12 dispatch: Education won't be any more prominent of an issue in the in the general election campaign for the White House this fall than it has been in the party primary season. That was the view of two of the three panelists at a symposium on Monday at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington. "This is the first time since 1980 or '84 that education has not loomed large, or at least ...


Last month, I wrote about how Ohio teachers sent a letter to Sen. Barack Obama, seeking clarification from the Democratic presidential hopeful on his stance on vouchers. Well, the Ohio Federation of Teachers got a response, and just in the knick of time, since the pivotal Ohio primary is tomorrow. What prompted Ohio teachers to write to Obama was a dust-up over his statements to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in the run-up to the Wisconsin primary in which he suggested he might change his mind on vouchers if research backs it up, and if it's what's best for kids. Ohio ...


Will the Democrats, who recaptured the House of Representatives in 2006, be able to hold on to their majority? Political analysts are betting they will - in part because the Republicans will have to defend 25 "open" seats previously held by GOP members. Two of those members are running for Senate, including Rep. Heather Wilson of New Mexico. Edweek's Erik Robelen profiled her 2004 congressional race. She defended the No Child Left Behind Act, which her opponent attacked. But most of the open GOP seats are the result of retirements. Who's retiring and what might those departures mean for education? ...


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