Consider this an e-stocking stuffer from those of us at Campaign K-12, who pass along the following good tidbits to tide you over during the holiday season: Much has been made of a split among Democrats on education policy, but is there a schism on the right, too? Ponder this at Flypaper. A member of Obama's agency review team on education tells a higher education publication that Linda Darling-Hammond, if she wants to, will either have a key role in the White House or in the Ed Department. Will Obama's stimulus package mean tidings of good cheer for schools? Maybe, ...


Not to throw cold water on the education secretary naming party, but did anyone else see that yesterday—while Obama was talking up the benefits of a longer school day and teacher quality during the Arne Duncan announcement—the governor of Alabama was taking steps to cut K-12 education funding by 9 percent? NINE PERCENT! That cut ranks as the biggest Alabama's seen in public school funding in half a century, and surely it's the most severe the country has seen this year. Alabama is only the most recent example of a state so deep in deficit that its governor ...


Rep. Peter Hoekstra of Michigan reportedly won't run for re-election in 2010. Apparently, the Republican is mulling a run for governor of the Wolverine State. Hoekstra has long been one of the most vocal opponents on the House Education and Labor Committee—and in Congress—of the No Child Left Behind Act's expansion of federal power over public schools. Last year, he introduced a bill that would have permitted states to opt out of NCLB's accountability requirements and managed to get more than 60 co-sponsors, including the incoming Republican whip, Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia. Looks like the scale-back-the-federal-role crowd will...


Rick Hess of the American Enterprise Institute and Rick Kahlenberg, an author and a senior fellow at Education Sector, will be discussing Obama's education secretary pick.


Chicago education activists share their thoughts on Arne Duncan. Small schools advocate Michael Klonsky, for one, thinks Duncan's been "liberated" by Obama.


Just a few minutes ago, President-elect Obama officially tapped Chicago Public Schools Superintendent Arne Duncan as the next education secretary. In listening to his remarks, it's clear that Obama wants a no-excuses leader who isn't afraid to make tough choices to increase student achievement. Obama, as part of his announcement today in Chicago, touted Duncan's on-the-ground experience making those tough decisions: When faced with tough decisions, Arne doesn’t blink. He’s not beholden to any one ideology – and he doesn’t hesitate for one minute to do what needs to be done. He’s worked tirelessly to improve teacher ...


Washington D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Rhee says an urban superintendent is a good pick for the job.


The Chicago-area media, bloggers, and educators may know Arne Duncan best, and here's what they're saying.


In this video, Obama's new ed. sec. talks about his mom's afterschool program, how basketball skills translate to leadership skills, and what his school reform strategy is.


Even before President-elect Obama makes Arne Duncan's selection as education secretary official, early reaction around the blogsphere is very positive.


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