One could really question the political strategy on the part of the Indianapolis teachers' union after watching this. At issue is the shocking loss of Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson , a Democrat, in Tuesday's election, despite outspending Republican political newcomer, Greg Ballard, by 10-1. Peterson, who is a major champion of charter schools, is known nationally for working to expand options for students in Indianapolis Public Schools' by authorizing 16 charter schools for the city. This growth had prompted IPS Superintendent Eugene White to call for a moratorium last year, declaring that the loss of students was draining money from the ...


When a new governor gets elected, there's a new sheriff in town. And that's bound to mean changes, including in the education realm. Kentucky Gov.-elect Steve Beshear, a Democrat who beat incumbent Republican Gov. Ernie Fletcher, already is letting the State Board of Education know who's the boss in Kentucky. The board of education is in middle of a search for a new education commissioner to replace Gene Wilhoit, who left last year to lead the Council of Chief State School Officers. The board had narrowed the choice to four, and was poised to name a new commissioner next ...


In the wake of Tuesday's resounding "no" vote on vouchers in Utah, I thought I'd get some analysis from the two men responsible for financing most of the $7-million-plus political battle (which was more expensive than the state's last governor's race). And they are: the National Education Association's Reg Weaver, and Overstock.com's Patrick Byrne. Byrne, the Utah resident who founded and still leads the Internet shopping site, gave more than $2 million (including some contributions from his family) to the pro-voucher cause. He had a very terse, concise answer for what might have made a difference in swinging more ...


Republican presidential contender Mike Huckabee, the former governor of Arkansas, told attendees at a forum yesterday in Iowa what he thinks is the No. 1 problem facing America's schools. Kids are bored. He called it a "huge, stupid mistake" that schools have changed their curriculum to include so much emphasis on math, science, and other core classes at the expense of subjects such as art and music, which may keep students more engaged in school. There's no easy fix to student boredom, especially from the president's vantage. Do you agree with Huckabee that part of the problem with schools today ...


On the same day we learned that voters in Utah decisively shot down the nation's first universal private-school voucher program, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney—who has significant ties to the state—reiterated today that he will promote school choice as part of his education agenda. So where was Romney during the voucher fight in Utah? He pretty much kept quiet, despite pleas from voucher advocates to lend his political capital to the fight. Perhaps he saw the polls, which consistently indicated vouchers as a losing issue in Utah. Or, maybe he was busy in early primary states, such as ...


Utah voters decisively and loudly spoke through the ballot box and repealed what would have been the nation's first universal voucher program, according to unofficial election results. When the legislature approved the law earlier this year, the margin was by a single vote. But the opposition in the general voting public was much stronger. With nearly 97 percent of the votes counted, 62 percent voted against vouchers, 38 percent voted for, during Utah's first "citizens' veto" statewide referendum in 30 years. This is a resounding victory for the law's biggest opponents: the teachers' unions, including the National Education Association, which ...


Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson, a Democrat and the only mayor in the country who has the authority to open and run charter schools, lost a tight re-election bid and has given the Hoosier State one of its biggest upsets in political history. And I'm not just saying that because I'm a native Hoosier. Peterson, a two-term mayor who was dubbed the "Peyton Manning of Charter Schools" in a recent article in Education Next, lost to Republican Greg Ballard for reasons that don't have a lot to do with education. Rising crime and rising property taxes relegated this once-popular mayor to ...


Republican Gov. Ernie Fletcher, whose campaign was mired in a hirings-and-firings ethics scandal from earlier in his administration, did not win re-election. With 90 percent of the votes counted, his opponent, former Attorney General Steve Beshear, unseated the incumbent and gave Democrats control of another governor's office. Beshear netted 59 percent of the vote to Fletcher's 41 percent. Beshear doesn't have anything earth-shattering on his education agenda—the ever-popular pre-kindergarten expansion, a pledge to raise teacher salaries, and a promise to provide more dual-enrollment opportunities so students can earn college credit while going to high school. This was a race ...


Voters in several states will make decisions today that will affect the quality of schools for years to come. The biggies: Vouchers—The polls don't look good for supporters of statewide, universal vouchers in Utah. Voters will consider whether or not to repeal a law approved earlier this year by the legislature that would give every student a voucher worth between $500 and $3,000, depending on income. Governors—Voters in Mississippi and Kentucky will elect their heads-of-state. Kentucky incumbent Gov. Ernie Fletcher, a Republican, is in danger of losing to Democrat Steve Beshear. In Mississippi, Republican Haley Barbour seems ...


Republican presidential candidate Fred Thompson, who is big supporter of the National Rifle Association and an opponent of gun-control measures, came out on Sunday in favor of allowing law-abiding students to carry concealed weapons on college campuses, so long as they comply with campus and state rules. The issue came up on Meet the Press, when journalist Tim Russert asked the former Tennessee senator about allowing students to carry weapons in light of the shootings in April at Virginia Tech. He first told Russert: "I don’t think that all students need to be carrying weapons on the school campus." ...


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments