I was in South Carolina over the weekend, and got to experience life in a presidential primary state. Since I was visiting family, I was confined to watching the political developments as most voters do—through television and the newspapers. However, I attended part of a Martin Luther King Jr. Day rally at the South Carolina Statehouse on Monday, where ministers and activists with the NAACP addressed a crowd of thousands before the three Democratic presidential frontrunners spoke. And it was here when it struck me: this is a state where education could be an issue that drives votes, especially ...


Dave Riegel, an Ohio school administrator, has an interesting interview with ED in '08's Roy Romer. Take a look, because you probably won't be reading any interviews between me and Mr. Romer anytime soon. I had one scheduled awhile back, but the ED in '08 folks cancelled, citing a couple of posts (here and here) that I wrote. And while you're at it, take a spin through ohdave's other thoughtful entries as well....


...when you make the Carnival. This edition of the Carnival, courtesy of eduwonkette, features three other noteworthy campaign-related posts, including one by an 18-year-old who explains why so many youth dig Obama....


During Tuesday's Democratic debate in Las Vegas, sponsored by MSNBC, the three front-runners were asked a very serious question about education. To what do you attribute the high dropout rate among African-American students, and what would you do about it? The question went to Illinois Sen. Barack Obama first, but eventually, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards answered it, too. Their proposed solutions were similar, and complementary: universal prekindergarten, after-school programs, "second-chance" schools for dropouts, promoting fatherhood, etc. But did you notice something in common about their answers? In response to a question about kids ...


The day Republican Mitt Romney seemed to catch fire by winning the Michigan primary, the National Science Board released a report that resulted in this New York Times headline: "Global Advances Challenge U.S. Dominance in Science." Dig deep into the report, released by the governing board of the National Science Foundation, and you'll find that student performance in math and science is both encouraging and depressing, while one big (and not surprising) problem persists: An achievement gap between minority and nonminority students in those two subjects doesn't improve as they progress through school, and in some cases, gets worse. ...


When you're done reviewing Mitt Romney's victory last night in Michigan from the likes of The Washington Post, Google News, or your favorite blog, you should turn to one more authority on this presidential race: kids. Education publishing company Scholastic has deployed its "Kid Reporters" to write, photograph, and blog about the 2008 presidential campaign. You can read what they have to say about the Michigan primary here. You also can read 12-year-old Elizabeth Conway's review of Republican Mike Huckabee's "Huckaburger." (She notes that "a deep-fried pickle—a specialty of Arkansas—may have offset the nutritional value of the vegetables.") ...


The Nevada affiliate of the National Education Association is obviously feeling some heat for its decision to file suit to protest new at-large precincts at casinos on the Las Vegas Strip that will make it easier for workers to vote during Saturday's caucus. The Nevada State Teachers Association is defending itself on its Web site, maintaining that their suit isn't about drowning out the voice of the state's largest union, which represents culinary and other workers in the casinos (and happens to be endorsing Illinois Sen. Barack Obama.) Instead, the lawsuit complains of inequalities—that teachers are not afforded the ...


Yes, this presidential election is very important to the future of public schools. And yes, the campaign is shaping up to be a fascinating barn-burner. But as I've been scanning headlines from across the country, I've been reminded that the nuts-and-bolts of running schools—from how many teachers a school can afford to hire to what kind of after-school programs a district can offer—are determined by state and local politicians, many of whom will be elected or re-elected this year. Headlines from major newspapers across the country—just from the last week—foreshadow daunting budget tasks that politicians will ...


The teachers' unions are very busy in Nevada, which will host a presidential primary on Jan. 19. But the political strategies of the two powerful, rival unions — the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association — are very different. To make sure their teachers are heard, one union has filed a lawsuit seeking to drown out another union's voice, while the other teachers' union is using the grassroots method. The Nevada State Teachers Association, an affiliate of the NEA, is suing the state Democratic Party for making it easier for culinary workers in the Las Vegas casinos to vote. ...


When is getting an education endorsement not a good thing? When you're a Republican, and you get the approval of a state affiliate of the National Education Association. About a month ago, my colleague and Campaign K-12 contributor Alyson Klein wondered whether Mike Huckabee's endorsement by the New Hampshire affiliate of the NEA would help him win his party's nomination. Well, someone finally used it as ammunition in a debate. Last night, at the South Carolina debate televised on Fox News, former Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson included that NEA endorsement in a list of other perceived Republican sins (like raising ...


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