From contributing blogger Alyson Klein: One interesting little factoid I left out of my post on the Association of Educational Publishers election forum Friday came from Lisa Graham Keegan, Sen. John McCain's education adviser. At a press conference following the event, Keegan said that the presumptive Republican presidential nominee has a core of about 15 education advisers, many of whom I think are listed here. But apparently, he also has about 100 people in total, working on education for the campaign across the country. That sounds like ... a lot. Even Keegan described it as "unwieldy." Maybe that's why they haven't ...


From contributing blogger Alyson Klein: So this morning I attended the Association of Educational Publishers election forum in Washington. Lisa Graham Keegan, former Arizona schools chief turned adviser to the presidential campaign of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., squared off with Jeanne Century, director of science education and the director of research and evaluation at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, who represented the campaign of Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill. They managed to cover a lot of ground without getting into a lot of specificity, in very campaign-like fashion. They both seem to agree that there ...


As some astute readers have noticed, there's a new face on my blog. Look up! It's the NEA's Joel Packer, who is proclaiming in the above advertisement to have ALL of the answers. While I don't have anything to do with Joel's smiling face appearing there, I thought I'd use this opportunity to ask the answer-man some important Campaign K-12 questions, since I only have SOME of the answers: 1. Obama won the Democratic nomination without the NEA's official endorsement. Will the NEA hold much power with Obama or his advisors? 2. Will the NEA spend more than ED in ...


From contributing blogger Alyson Klein: The general election debate over education policy, that is. Federal reporter extraordinaire David Hoff and I will be attending a forum tomorrow sponsored by the Association of Educational Publishers. It's being billed as the first chance for some the education advisers of Sen. John McCain and Sen. Barack Obama to square off. The representatives are: Jeanne Century, Director of Science Education and the Director of Research and Evaluation University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, representing Obama, and Lisa Graham Keegan, principal with the Keegan Company and former state schools superintendent in ...


From contributing blogger Alyson Klein: The National Education Association is finally planning to endorse Sen. Barack Obama, now that he has enough delegates to claim the Democratic presidential nomination. Way to go out on a limb there, NEA. (Hat tip to Mike Antonucci, who I've linked to above, and Mike Petrilli at Flypaper)....


From contributing blogger Alyson Klein: Last night kicked off the general election in earnest. And, although neither Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois nor Sen. John McCain of Arizona focused in detail on education in their speeches (big surprise), their general election arguments on education began to take shape. And both speeches were just as notable for what they didn't say as what they did. Sen. Barack Obama , now the presumptive Democratic nominee, said he wants to provide more resources to schools, particularly for teacher training: "If John McCain spent some time in the schools of South Carolina or St. Paul, ...


From contributing blogger Alyson Klein: Today is finally, finally the last day of the Democratic presidential primary. After South Dakota and Montana finish voting tonight, there will be no one left to decide the Democratic contest except the party's superdelegates. There aren't too many out there who remain uncommitted, just 160 left, according to politico.com. Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois has 2,074 delegates in total, according to realclearpolitics, while Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York has 1,915. The number needed to clinch the nomination is 2,118. So, it appears to be up to the superdelegates ...


ED in '08's Roy Romer and Sen. Barack Obama have now entered the hugging phase, which brings me to the following question: How nonpartisan can an organization be when its leader and chief spokesman is so partisan? Before Obama delivered his major education speech at a school outside of Denver on Wednesday, he got an enthusiastic introduction from former Colorado Gov. Romer, and a hug, as pictured in the AP photo above. Romer, who is also the chairman of the nonpartisan ED in '08 campaign, introduced Ilinois Democrat as the "next president of the United States" and praised him with ...


From contributing blogger David Hoff: In response to Sen. Barack Obama's education speech yesterday, the McCain campaign is circulating the following sentence I wrote in 2007: In his eight years in the state Senate and two years in the U.S. Senate, Mr. Obama hasn’t made a significant mark on education policy. I'd like to remind the campaign that earlier this year I quoted an Arizona superintendent saying this about McCain: I don’t think he has a strong track record of putting education at the top of his priorities. Read the Obama story and the McCain story and ...


Sen. Barack Obama was in Colorado today, talking about education at Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts in the town of Thornton. The school is one of 17 small learning environments in the 5,800-student Mapleton School District. Here, all 44 of the school's seniors were accepted to college—which stands in stark contrast to the dismal dropout rates in many high schools across the country. So Obama used this as an opportunity to talk more about his education plan, including teacher-recruitment initiatives, "fixing" the No Child Left Behind Act, and a $4,000 tax credit to help students pay ...


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