Lost in the Super Tuesday hoopla was the fact that California voters agreed to expand tribal gambling in their state by adding 17,000 slot machines to further tempt people. The proceeds will go to help prop up the state budget. Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who supported and helped broker the gambling deal with the legislature last year, even appeared in television ads (included below) with state superintendent of public instruction Jack O'Connell. (And those two don't always see eye to eye). The message? More slot machines=more money for schools. This isn't just a California issue. In Illinois, the ...


In the wake of the Super Tuesday results, which showed no clear favorite among Democrats, the 3.2-million member National Education Association wants to remind Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama that the union's endorsement is still up for grabs. With that endorsement comes access to hundreds of thousands of NEA volunteers, who could prove crucial in the political ground game. In a press release issued this morning, NEA President Reg Weaver said neither Obama nor Clinton has made the case that would earn them the association’s recommendation. “There have been dozens of debates but less than a handful ...


No matter what you think of the presidential candidates, you have to respect the enthusiasm that the tight Democratic and Republican contests have sparked, which played out in results from the Super Tuesday primaries. The youth vote is proving crucial, particularly in the Democratic primaries, where voters have the opportunity to elect either the first woman or African-American to the White House. Exit polls from the primary states that voted yesterday show just how involved young people are. In Georgia, for example, 11 percent of young people ages 18-29 voted in 2004. This year: 18 percent. In Tennessee, 7 percent ...


Democratic Sen. Hillary Clinton is perhaps the only presidential candidate who talks about special education on the campaign trail—and that's probably a wise move, since about 6.8 million children in the United States have disabilities. That represents about 12 percent of students nationwide—a not-to-be-overlooked proportion of American families. Last night, during Clinton's national town hall meeting broadcast on the Hallmark Channel and online, the first question she fielded was on education. She used this as an opportunity to bash the No Child Left Behind Act as an unfunded federal mandate that has resulted in schools full of "little...


Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and longtime state Education Czar Nancy Grasmick look like they're about to sign a peace treaty between two warring countries. Almost. These two arch enemies are now pretending to be friends after the Democratic governor backed down Monday from his demands for legislation that he get to appoint his own education superintendent. If you'll remember, he was all riled up that the state board of education renewed her contract over his opposition....


Unless Mitt Romney can pull off a N.Y. Giants-esque upset on Super Tuesday, Republican John McCain seems destined to claim the Republican presidential nomination. And so I went searching again for more insight into how Sen. McCain might change the No Child Left Behind Act. On his Web site, you can find a little bit about his education ideas, including a video where he extols the benefits of school choice. But I'm still left wanting to know more about what specific changes he'd like to make to President Bush's signature education law. Perhaps most telling, in March 2007, the ...


ED in '08 is back in the news again, and this time, the Washington Post is assessing the group's effectiveness at making education a top-tier presidential campaign issue in a story today. The story calls attention to ED in '08's split from the country's largest teachers' union in endorsing some form of performance pay for teachers. The biggest "ouch" factor is at the end of the story. John I. Wilson, the National Education Association's executive director, says: "They have a nice slogan. They have nice bumper stickers and pins. They try to get their logo in pictures. But it just ...


That's Bill Clinton, not Hillary. In this story, the former president is blaming Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy, one of the architects of the No Child Left Behind Act, for the "train wreck" that he says the law has become. Hmmmm. Could this be President Clinton's payback for Sen. Kennedy's endorsement of Hillary Clinton's chief opponent, Barack Obama?...


Did you catch last night's relatively tame debate between Democratic presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama on CNN? Education got only a passing mention. However, as I listened to the two candidates, it occurred to me that perhaps the single most important thing that the next president can do for schools has little to do with education, at least on its face. And that's reforming health care. I argue this for two reasons. First, there were 8.7 million uninsured children in the U.S. in 2006, according to the latest Census data. That's enough students to fill about ...


This is not good news for Democrat Hillary Clinton, who is in a Super Tuesday dogfight with Barack Obama....


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