That's Bill Clinton, not Hillary. In this story, the former president is blaming Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy, one of the architects of the No Child Left Behind Act, for the "train wreck" that he says the law has become. Hmmmm. Could this be President Clinton's payback for Sen. Kennedy's endorsement of Hillary Clinton's chief opponent, Barack Obama?...


Did you catch last night's relatively tame debate between Democratic presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama on CNN? Education got only a passing mention. However, as I listened to the two candidates, it occurred to me that perhaps the single most important thing that the next president can do for schools has little to do with education, at least on its face. And that's reforming health care. I argue this for two reasons. First, there were 8.7 million uninsured children in the U.S. in 2006, according to the latest Census data. That's enough students to fill about ...


This is not good news for Democrat Hillary Clinton, who is in a Super Tuesday dogfight with Barack Obama....


The field is narrowing. John Edwards, the former senator from North Carolina, and former New York City mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani are expected to drop out of the presidential contest today. Edwards had, arguably, been the most critical of NCLB of the three Democrats left, even suggesting at one point that lawmakers might want to consider "ditching" the law, a six-year-old reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. His rivals, Sens. Hillary Clinton of New York, and Barack Obama of Illinois, both advocate for “fixing” the measure, but neither has suggested scrapping it entirely. UPDATE: Read the remarks John ...


That's essentially the question that is asked of six students—two each from the United States, India, and China—in the "2 Million Minutes" documentary that was screened last night at the Jack Valenti Theater in Washington and that I previewed here. The ED in '08 folks, who are partnering with the production company Broken Pencil Productions to market the film, were kind enough to invite me. Dozens of policy wonks attended, representing the U.S. Department of Education, the Council of Chief State School Officers, and Strong American Schools, which is directing the ED in '08 campaign. The hour-long ...


Not long after the 1998 school shootings at Jonesboro Middle School in Arkansas, which left three students and a teacher dead in what was then one of the worst acts of school violence in the country, then-Gov. Mike Huckabee signed a book deal for "Kids Who Kill," published that same year by B&H Publishing Group. The book deal sparked criticism, fury, and resentment from families and other community members affected by the tragedy who claimed the governor was profiting from the violence. Ten years later, as Huckabee campaigns for the Republican presidential nomination, the hard feelings haven't disappeared....


During President Bush's State of the Union, he touted a re-packaged $300 million "Pell Grants for Kids" program that would essentially give scholarships or vouchers to help low-income students trapped in failing schools. And he again touted the No Child Left Behind Act, which will become—for better or for worse—his education legacy. Yet the Democratic candidates' official responses didn't touch the subject of education. In his official response, Sen. Barack Obama didn't address education. Neither did Sen. Hillary Clinton of New York or former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards. And even Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius, who isn't in ...


After months of remaining neutral in the race for the Democratic nomination, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., the chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, has endorsed Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., for president. But, although Obama sits on the senate education panel, Kennedy didn’t mention reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Law in his endorsement speech today at American University in Washington. He gave only a quick nod to education – praising Obama for “fashioning legislation to put high quality teachers in our classrooms" - an apparent reference to Obama's bill to establish "teacher residencies", which ...


A whopping $40 million. That's how much the National Education Association is prepared to spend in this crucial 2008 election year. Read more about that in EdWeek's latest political story, by my colleague David Hoff. That money still isn't devoted to a specific candidate, and as Joe Williams of Democrats for Education Reform wisely notes in the story, the NEA is likely waiting to back a candidate who is sure to win the nomination. The American Federation of Teachers, meanwhile, has put its money on Hillary Clinton. The $40 million committment from NEA is almost as much as Bill Gates ...


Voters with education on their minds aren't concerned just about math and science—key areas of focus for politicians and policymakers—but with imaginination, innovation, and the arts as well. That's according to a new poll, backed by education groups including the nation's largest teachers' union, the National Education Association, and (not surprising, given the results and subject of the poll) the Arts Education Partnership. The poll seems tailor-made for Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee, whose education agenda centers on advancing the arts in schools—what he calls "weapons of mass instruction." In fact, 56 percent of those polled said ...


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