Unlike Barack Obama, who really had no choice but to move his family to 1600 N. Pennsylvania in the District of Columbia, new ed sec Arne Duncan can move wherever he wants in the area. And since he has two school-age kids, Duncan is probably like a lot of parents who consider the quality of public schools as key in house-hunting. So while it's not surprising that Obama would choose private schools over the D.C. public schools for his kids, it's also not surprising that Duncan—who is now a prominent, national leader for America's public schools —is choosing ...


Arne Duncan, the brand-new Secretary of Education, said today that he would consider using $15 billion in proposed federal incentive grants to reward states for setting more "rigorous" standards. The money would be available to him under a broad $819 billion stimulus package that passed the House, with no GOP support, last night. "There's a series of things we're looking for," in allocating those funds, Duncan told me, in the first of a round of one-on-one interviews he gave to reporters. He indicated that the Department would want states that receive the funds to have a comprehensive data system, strong ...


The House of Representatives just passed its version of the stimulus package, which would provide some $120 billion for education programs, by a vote of 244-188. There weren't any significant changes to the education provisions in the bill, a Democratic congressional staffer told me. We wrote about the spending provisions of the bill here. As part of the tax portion of the $819 billion measure, $22 billion in school construction bonds is to be spread out over fiscal years 2009 and 2010. And it includes a $1.4 billion expansion of the Qualified Zone Academy Bond program, which helps finance ...


From guest blogger Stephen Sawchuk Senate Republicans have a lot to be grouchy about these days, it seems. And, as I discovered this morning, some of them aren't just irritated by the Democrats' handling of the stimulus proposal, but also at the Bush Administration's handling of the No Child Left Behind Act in the administration's final days. In remarks at a conference on federal-education priorities sponsored by the Economic Policy Institute and others, Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander's top aide, David Cleary, had some choice comments about the new and old administrations. "I didn't realize how much we liked Arne Duncan ...


As the House of Representatives debated the $825 billion stimulus measure, which members are expected to vote on tonight, Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., the chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, held a conference call with reporters to talk about the money for education in the stimulus package. Republicans, including the Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon of California, the top GOP member of the House education panel, have expressed concern that it might be tough to take programs like Title I and spending for students in special education back down to their current levels after the record increases in ...


The Senate Appropriations Committee today approved some $125 billion on education programs as part of a mammoth $825 billion economic stimulus package. The bill was approved on a 21-9 vote, with some more moderate Republicans crossing over to vote with the Democrats. Other GOP lawmakers, however, argued that they were shut out of the process of crafting the bill and that the measure would do little to stimulate the stumbling economy. The education provisions in the Senate bill are pretty similar to those in the House version of the measure, as I detailed here. Additionally, there's $16 billion for K-12 ...


The bill would provide about $125 billion for education programs.


Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., may have lost the White House but he got the next best thing: A seat on the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee.


There's been a lot of speculation that some of the folks who attended a meeting with Duncan this morning may be tapped for key positions in the U.S. Department of Education.


I'm sitting in the House Appropriations Committee's markup on the $825 billion federal stimulus package and it looks like it's going to be a very late evening. Republicans say they are concerned about how quickly the legislation is being pushed through. They say there hasn't been much bipartisan cooperation and that members haven't had a lot of time to ask questions about the measure, which includes some $122 billion for education. But Rep. David R. Obey, D-Wis., the appropriations committee's chairman and a key author of the legislation, argued that the committee has gotten input from anyone who offered it, ...


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