If you read my colleague David Hoff's new piece about Margaret Spellings, you'll see that she seems to put to rest speculation , at least for the near future, that she may return to her home state of Texas to pursue a run for governor in 2010, or possibly the U.S. Senate. Spellings told EdWeek's Hoff that she expects to keep living in suburban Washington, D.C., until her youngest daughter graduates from high school in 2010. “I’m probably going to stay in Washington for a while,” she said....


With Republican presidential contender John McCain poised to make a strong showing—or even win—tomorrow's primary in New Hampshire, it seems appropriate to re-examine his views on education. That's not such an easy task. Education doesn't make the Arizona senator's list of issues on his campaign website. McCain doesn't talk much about No Child Left Behind (which he voted for as a member of the Senate in 2001) on the campaign trail, but he has said he favors some changes in testing requirements, particularly as they relate to English-language learners. In the Dec. 12 debate in Iowa, when asked ...


The results from yesterday's Iowa caucuses make one thing very clear: these Midwestern voters are demanding change. So they gave their votes to Republican Mike Huckabee, a likable, though sometimes gaffe-prone, bass-playing former Arkansas governor who has made arts education his big school initiative. And to Democrat Barack Obama, an African-American candidate who has billed himself as a force for change, who has dared to broach the subject of merit pay for teachers and who hasn't been nearly as fierce in his opposition of No Child Left Behind as some of his opponents. (Democrat Hillary Clinton made a passing mention ...


Today, voters in Iowa will help decide who will be our next president, and today here in the Washington D.C. area, I'm about halfway through last year's season of the HBO show, "The Wire." What does "The Wire" have to do with the Iowa caucuses, you ask? Well nothing, except the two got me thinking... This gritty, in-your-face, no-apologies drama about how street life rules Baltimore turned its lens on the city's public schools in Season Four. And the result wasn't pretty. (I happen to be a Baltimore resident so this show is pretty much required viewing in my ...


If I were writing this as a traditional news story, this would be my lead: "Forty-two percent of voters surveyed in a recent Associated Press-Yahoo poll said they would be much more likely, or somewhat more likely, to vote for a candidate who supports teacher-led prayer in public schools." But since this is my blog, here's what I will say: "For the 42 percent of voters who think teacher-led prayer is such a good idea that they would base their choice for president on it, have you considered regulating such prayer? Imagine what the teachers could pray about: 'Dear God, ...


In Maryland, the icy and downright hostile relationship between State Superintendent of Schools Nancy Grasmick and Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley exemplifies the ugly power struggle that can result when a governor doesn't directly control his state's school chief. As O'Malley continues to push for Grasmick's resignation, she refuses to step down. After all, the governor is not her boss—the State Board of Education is. Reporter Liz Bowie details the duel from Grasmick's perspective in this Baltimore Sun story. Says one Grasmick critic in the story, who wants her to bow to the wishes of Gov. O'Malley: "The governor was ...


Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who resisted efforts to bring vouchers to his home state when he was governor, is now trying to say he's a school-voucher champion. Except his record, and others, say differently. First of all, the New Hampshire affiliate of the National Education Association thinks he's against vouchers, and used that rationale to explain why it endorsed him as the Republican choice in this early-voting state. Incidentally, Huckabee has not been out on the campaign trail, jumping up and down asserting that the NEA got it wrong. Moreover, his record as governor in Arkansas shows just how ...


Although Democratic candidate Joe Biden says education will be his top domestic priority if elected president, his plan to fix public schools apparently isn't very remarkable, or memorable, at least to the Associated Press. A story that moved on the AP wires today declared: "Democrat Joe Biden unveiled an education plan Wednesday that would provide free preschool to every child and bonuses to teachers who work in poor neighborhoods." Except Biden, a U.S. Senator from Delaware, unveiled the same plan more than two months ago....


ED in '08 has come out with an in-your-face public-service announcement in these days before the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses. The ad, which ED in '08 says will start running soon in key battleground states, portrays several teenagers who declare that they are the future. But the future is bleak: "I will steal your car," one student says. "I will use drugs to escape," another says. "You will support me because I can't get a job." You get the idea. ED in '08, whose goal is to make education a top priority in the presidential campaign, still has a long ...


With Oprah Winfrey's rock-star support of Barack Obama, ABC News reporter Diane Sawyer wonders what's next for the daytime talk diva if the Democratic senator from Illinois wins the presidency. Education secretary, perhaps? Watch the video of Oprah's answer from yesterday, (fast-forward to minute 5:15), and you'll find that her evasive answer shows she's ready for politics, even if she says a government job isn't for her. She says she can't think of a more compelling job than the one she has now, which she "kinda" likes. For now, anyway, Oprah's sights seem to be set on the monumental ...


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