School construction funds and increased education aid to states were still in play as congressional negotiators worked on a compromise for the economic stimulus bill.


The Great GOP Divide among governors was on display yesterday as Republican Florida Gov. Charlie Crist appeared with President Obama during a pep-rally stop in the Sunshine State to tout the economic stimulus package. Florida's schools have been among the hardest hit across the country as cuts have forced them to lay off teachers and trim programs. Legislative leaders predict next year's state budget deficit could reach $5 billion, and already, the governor has pushed through a $2.5 billion package of cuts for this budget year and next. Given his state's dire straits—with a huge home foreclosure crisis ...


The bill, which would provide some $80 billion for education programs, now goes to conference with a House version that would include $140 billion for schools and colleges


U.S. education secretary, Arne Duncan went to Arlington, Va.'s Wakefield High School as part of a public relations push to get Congress to restore $16 billion in school construction money eliminated from the Senate version of the economic stimulus package.


As Congress is poised to spend at least $80 billion on education programs—and possibly much more—President Barack Obama said that more money for schools must be followed by more reform.


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will turn up the pressure on Congress to fund school construction during a visit tomorrow to a Virginia high school slated for renovation in 2013.


The Senate's original bill would have provided between $120 billion and $140 billion for education. The amendment would dial that back to about $80 billion.


Rumor has it that, compared with the original Senate version, the deal now on the table would sizably scale back increases to education.


Here's a roundup of stories to tide you over while you're waiting for the verdict on the stimulus package...


I've heard from folks up on the Hill that an amendment to be introduced by Sens. Ben Nelson, D-Neb., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, could significantly scale back the nearly $140 billion education funding in the Senate's version of the proposed economic stimulus package. The items targeted include at least $24.8 billion to be cut from the $79 billion State Stabilization Fund, $6.75 billion out of the more than $13 billion for special education, $6.5 billion from Title I out of $13 billion, and $50 million from the proposed $100 million Teacher Quality Enhancement grant program. Advocates are ...


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