President-elect Donald Trump's education secretary, whoever it is, won't be able to follow through on one of the campaign's signature education promises: scapping the common core standards.


The election of Donald Trump to the White House could be a major curve ball for implementation of the nearly year-old Every Student Succeeds Act.


With Donald Trump headed to the White House and the GOP controlling Congress, Republicans have their best chance yet to scrap—or seriously scale back—the Education Department.


In the last round of federal Investing in Innovation grants under President Obama, the competition intended to find and build up research-based educational interventions has borne its first full fruit.


The North Carolina Republican long has been rumored to be a top candidates to replace the outgoing chairman, Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., who is retiring.


President-elect Donald Trump also will work to ensure "a new way of how to deliver public education," said Gerard Robinson, a former Florida and Virginia state chief.


Although public school policy wasn't a particularly big issue during the 2016 campaign, Congress could still get very busy when it comes to education in general.


The real estate executive has largely ignored education during his successful presidential bid, except for a $20 billion federal investment in school choice he announced in September.


The National Education Associated reported that seven times more members volunteered this election season than back in 2012.


Public school policy has mostly been ignored in the race for the White House, and sadly for many of you education wonks, not much has changed. But it is voting day, so we've got a quick refresher for you on the candidates' education policies.


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