The National Center for Education Statistics reports that K-12 spending at the state and district level increased by 1.2 percent from fiscal 2013 to fiscal 2014.


The national graduation rate hit an all-time high at 83.2 percent for the 2014-15 school year, up nearly 5 percentage points since the 2010-11 school year. But there's more to the story.


Nearly every secretary came into the job with a long record in K-12 policy. But, if Hillary Clinton is elected president next month, she may break with that longstanding tradition and choose someone with a higher education background.


High school graduation rates inched up for the fourth year in a row, by nearly one percentage point in the 2014-15 school year, the Obama administration announced Monday.


The union wants more than just a few tweaks to the accountability plans that were already on the books under the No Child Left Behind Act and its waivers.


In the speech to an ed-tech company, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton also expressed skepticism that most politicians aside from governors or mayors can exert much influence on K-12.


The U.S. Department of Education today released its long-awaited final rules on teacher preparation. The rules, first proposed in 2014, aim to hold teacher-training programs accountable for the performance of their graduates.


Zephyr Teachout, the Democratic candidate in New York's 19th district, opposes high-stakes testing and the common core, while GOP candidate John Faso is a big charter school fan.


The union had heard that Joel Klein, the former New York City School chancellor, was working with the campaign, and it was not pleased.


Want a crash course in how education is playing out in the presidential campaign? Check out this video, featuring both halves of Politics K-12.


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