The twists and turns of Every Student Succeeds Act implementation dominated the conversation as the education secretary sat down with Politics K-12's Alyson Klein.


The disagreement relates to how the law tries to create more stability for foster care students by emphasizing their "school of origin."


Professor and radio show host Sam Clovis serves as Trump's national co-chair. He is not a fan of the Common Core State Standards, but he does like charter schools and civics.


Should the department ask states to come up with their own "maximum" time during which a student is expected to become proficient? And if so, what kind of research should inform states' timelines?


The proposed ESSA accountability regulations the U.S. Department of Education released last week could make schools' transition to the new law trickier than previously expected.


If you're still reading up on the draft accountability rules for the Every Student Succeeds Act—don't worry, lots of folks are still reading the 192 pages and figuring out what they mean.


The much-anticipated rules deal with a number of complicated and often controversial topics related to school ratings, test participation, school turnaround requirements, and more.


Pre-K access, achievement gaps, and the Every Student Succeeds Act came up as advisers to the two Democratic presidential hopefuls debated education policy at the Newseum in Washington.


Proposed rules released Thursday by the Education Department include state accountability plans and what school report cards have to include under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


The federal agencies' assertion that Title IX's prohibition on sex discrimination also applies to gender identity is incorrect, says the complaint filed by Alabama, Arizona, and nine other states.


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